Lang Dale in the Yorkshire Wolds near Fordon
Lang Dale in the Yorkshire Wolds near Fordon

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Route No. 303 - Monday 20 July 2009
Lang Dale, North Dale, Fordon,
Cans Dale, Danebury Manor circuit - 12km
Yorkshire Wolds . . .

Ordnance Survey route map on the Landranger series map base.
View the route in Google Earth

Map: Ordnance Survey Explorer 301 Scarborough, Bridlington & Flamborough Head at 1:25000


Setting off along the road towards Flixton
Setting off along the road towards Flixton

After about 300m the Wolds Way route went off to the right of the road but we continued for another 200m to map ref. TA047776. Here we turned off the road to the left to join the Wolds Way for about 150m to drop down into Lang Dale.

This morning I drove to the eastern edge of the Yorkshire Wolds a few miles inland from Filey. I met two friends at map ref. TA050770 about 3km south of Flixton on the road to the hamlet of Fordon. It was a fine sunny day with a pleasant breeze. We started walking just after 10.00am back along the road towards Flixton.

The Wolds Way leaves the road heading for Filey
The Wolds Way leaves the road heading for Filey

The path (part of the Wolds Way) dropping down in to Lang Dale
The path (part of the Wolds Way) dropping down in to Lang Dale
Pink vetch by the path
Pink vetch by the path
Scabius by the path
Scabius by the path
Farm land in Lang Dale
Farm land in Lang Dale
Harebells in Lang Dale
Harebells in Lang Dale
Lady's Bedstraw in the meadow by the path in Lang Dale
Lady's Bedstraw in the meadow by the path in Lang Dale
Farm land in Lang Dale
Farm land in Lang Dale

Path along Lang Dale
Path along Lang Dale

The rough pasture up the steep valley sides was covered with all manner of wild flowers.

An owl nesting box in a scots pine
An owl nesting box in a Scots pine

They support the bird population and their predators and we passed two trees with substantial owl nesting boxes attached to them.

We followed the path in the bottom of Lang Dale and into North Dale.

Path along North Dale
Path along North Dale

These meadows are the basis of the rich variety of wild life in these valleys with many insects and small mammals living in them.

An owl nesting box in an ash tree
An owl nesting box in an ash tree

Large white butterfly on the path
Large white butterfly on the path
Striking purple example of a large bell flower
Striking purple example of a large bell flower

Cluster of large bracket fungi on an old ash tree
Cluster of large bracket fungi on an old ash tree

Emerging from North Dale into Fordon
Emerging from North Dale into Fordon

She made several gestures as we passed which I stupidly did not recognise as sign language. Her mother tried to explain but I'm quite deaf and did not understand straight away. It was a very embarrassing failure in communication - sorry!

The path along North Dale brought us to a farm track which led into the hamlet of Fordon, a quiet well kept little place. We passed a couple with a young woman I took to be their daughter.

Start of a farm track into Fordon
Start of a farm track into Fordon

Western scarecrows in Fordon
Western scarecrows in Fordon

The crossroads in Fordon
The crossroads in Fordon

St. James church at Fordon
St. James church at Fordon

We passed the little church of St James, a satellite church of Hunmanby parish.

At the cross roads in Fordon we turned right to walk up the hill.

St. James church at Fordon
St. James church at Fordon

A limosin bull and one of his harem near Fordon
A limosin bull and one of his harem near Fordon

Trig point near North Cotes Road
Trig point near North Cotes Road

Then, at the crossroads, we turned left on to North Cotes Road, a lane between the fields.

We passed the trig point (map ref. TA045744) near the crossroads at the top of the hill.

Looking back to the crossroads along North Cotes Road
Looking back to the crossroads along North Cotes Road

Looking across the valley of the Gypsy Race from North Cotes Road
Looking from North Cotes Road across the valley of the Gypsy Race (a watercourse that runs into Bridlington harbour)
A huge field of barley
A huge field of barley
A huge field of rye
A huge field of rye
A huge field of pea vines
A huge field of pea vines
A huge wheat field
A huge wheat field

Oil seed rape, ripening in the sunshine
A huge field of oil seed rape, ripening in the sunshine

Tall concrete posts, apparently of war time origin?
Tall concrete posts, apparently of war time origin?

After about 2.5km we reached the road at map ref. TA072742 in Cans Dale.

We followed North Cotes Road between vast fields of healthy crops.

North Cotes Road, track  between the fields
North Cotes Road, track between the fields

North Cotes Road, track across the fields
North Cotes Road, track across the fields

Rolling wolds farm land from North Cotes Road
Rolling wolds farm land from North Cotes Road
Painted Lady butterfly on a burdock (a migrant from Spain/N.Africa)
Painted Lady butterfly on a burdock (a migrant from Spain/N.Africa)
Small Tortoiseshell butterfly on a burdock
Small Tortoiseshell butterfly on a burdock
Common Toadflax  by the path
Common Toadflax by the path
Red bartsia by the path
Red bartsia by the path

Small Tortoiseshell butterfly on the path
Small Tortoiseshell butterfly on the path

After about 350m, the track began to climb up the hillside between hedgerows to a semi-derelict farm called Danebury Manor.

At the road we turned left to walk along it for about 1.3km. Here we turned right off the road on to a track along Cans Dale.

Track climbing out of Cans Dale
Track climbing out of Cans Dale

The track along Cans Dale
The track along Cans Dale
Purple vetch by the path
Purple vetch by the path
A pair of large white butterflies mating
A pair of large white butterflies mating
Rolling fields as we climbed out of Cans Dale
Rolling fields as we climbed out of Cans Dale

Approaching Danebury Manor from Cans Dale
Approaching Danebury Manor from Cans Dale

From the road the sea and the cliffs at Bempton were just visible. The whole walk had been about 12km and had taken us four and a quarter hours including a couple of refreshment stops in the sunshine.

As we passed Danebury Manor we could see that a good deal of building work was in progress. I wondered if its name had anything to do with the tumulus marked on the map only about 250m away. We continued past the farm and along the road back to our starting point.

The last 100m to our cars at the end of our walk
The last 100m to our cars at the end of our walk

Looking to the sea and Bempton Cliffs from our start/finish point on the road
Looking to the sea and Bempton Cliffs from our start/finish point on the road