Weir on the river Rye near Nunnington
Weir on the river Rye near Nunnington - there used to be a seat here to admire the view, but no longer.

Menu:

National Parks

| 2001 walks | 2002 walks | 2003 walks | 2004 walks |
| 2005 walks | 2006 walks | 2007 walks | 2008 walks |
| 2009 walks | 2010 walks | 2011 walks | 2012 walks |
| 2013 walks | 2014 walks | 2015 walks | 2016 walks |
| 2017 walks | 1993-2000 library | Find a Route |
| A few Routes to print out | Request a Route... |

Route No. 314 - Wednesday 23 September 2009
Nunnington, River Rye,
Caukleys Bank circuit - 7km
Howardian Hills . . .

Ordnance Survey route map on the Landranger series map base.
View the route in Google Earth

Map: Ordnance Survey Explorer 300 Howardian Hills & Malton at 1:25000


Starting out across the fields from Nunnington
Starting out across the fields from Nunnington

Our parking spot was opposite the entrance to Nunnington Hall, a National Trust property. We walked south along the road, across the River Rye. We walked up the slope for about 200m to turn left off the road onto a footpath across the fields.

The weather forecast for today was quite good and this morning my neighbour, Jim, and I drove to Nunnington just a short drive from home on the River Rye about 10km by road south east of Helmsley. We parked in a little gravel area off the road at map ref. SE668795.

Approaching Mill Farm by the River Rye
Approaching Mill Farm by the River Rye

A guard goose at Mill Farm
A guard goose at Mill Farm

There used to be a bench seat with a very pleasant view of the weir and the river. The path seems to have been diverted a little further away from the river and the seat has gone altogether.

After a few hundred metres we were approaching Mill Farm. At the field boundary before the farm there is a weir on the River Rye.

The old mill building at Mill farm
The old mill building at Mill farm

Path along the field edge by the River Rye
Path along the field edge by the River Rye

Path along the field edge by the River Rye
Path along the field edge by the River Rye

River Rye at West Ness
River Rye at West Ness

Farm yard at West Ness
Farm yard at West Ness

We walked along the road through West Ness to a junction at map ref. SE689790. At the junction we took a track heading south between the fields.

We continued through Mill Farm and followed the path along the river bank for about 1.5km from the farm to the road at West Ness, map ref. SE688793.

There are still plenty of blackberries  to sample
There are still plenty of blackberries to sample

Sheep grazing across the River Rye
Sheep grazing across the River Rye

Delapidated chapel at West Ness
Delapidated chapel at West Ness

Start of the track from West Ness up to Caukleys Bank
Start of the track from West Ness up to Caukleys Bank

The track up to Caukleys Bank
The track up to Caukleys Bank

Berries & leaves of Black Bryony - very poisonous
View from the track up to Caukleys Bank
View from the track up to Caukleys Bank
View from the track up to Caukleys Bank
View from the track up to Caukleys Bank

There are Scots Pines planted at intervals along Caukleys Bank
There are Scots Pines planted at intervals along Caukleys Bank

We followed the track gradually rising on to Caukleys Bank. After around 2km we came to the trig point on Caukleys Bank at map ref. SE672782. Just beside the trig point is a seat with a pleasant view over the valley and the Howardian Hills towards Castle Howard to the south. We sat there for a while for a short break before continuing along the top of Caukleys Bank.

The track along Caukleys Bank
The track along Caukleys Bank

The trig point and seat on Caukleys Bank
The trig point and seat on Caukleys Bank

View south from the seat by the trig point on Caukleys Bank
View south from the seat by the trig point on Caukleys Bank

Our turning north off Caukleys Bank
Our turning north off Caukleys Bank

A seed drill at work on Caukleys Bank
A seed drill at work on Caukleys Bank

Here we turned right to follow a track northwards back to Nunnington village. The track brought us to the road by the village church at map ref. SE665790.

After about 300m we crossed the road at map ref. SE669782 and continued for another 400m to map ref. SE665781.

The track north back to Nunnington
The track north back to Nunnington

The track north back to Nunnington
The track north back to Nunnington

The village Church in Nunnington
The village Church in Nunnington

Returning through Nunnington village
Returning through Nunnington village

At the bottom of the hill we had a look at the River Rye from the bridge and then followed the road west to the road bridge over the river near Nunnington Hall and back to the car.

We walked down the hill into the village and after about 250m from the church we passed a huge walnut tree in the garden of a farm house.

Huge walnut tree in the garden of a farm house in Nunnington
Huge walnut tree in the garden of a farm house in Nunnington

The River Rye in Nunnington
The River Rye in Nunnington

The River Rye in Nunnington
The River Rye in Nunnington

We called in a pleasant cafe in the village for our usual coffee and bacon sandwich for our lunch and returned home for about 1.00pm

The whole walk was only 7km and including our break to admire the view it had taken us about two and a half hours.

Nunnington village
Nunnington village

Background Notes:
This walk is an easy family circuit of 7km, about 4.5miles, from the village of Nunnington on the River Rye. Nunnington Hall on the river bank in the village is owned by the National Trust. It's closed in winter but I believe it's open for the February half term holiday. There's been a manor house here since the 1200's but the present hall dates mainly from around 1700. There's an interesting collection of dolls houses, or miniature rooms as they are described, there called 'The Carlisle collection'. We take the path across the fields to the east around the south side of the hall and one of the first features to notice, well you can hardly miss them, are two huge lime trees by the path as we leave the village. Very soon we come to a weir across the River Rye where some of the river water would have been diverted into a mill race to power the water wheel at the mill at Mill Farm juat a few hundred metres further on. The tall mill building is still there but it long since ceased to be a working mill. All the way from Nunnington the walk follows the River Rye which rises in the Cleveland Hills near Osmotherly and flows into the River Derwent near Malton. We continue along the river side to West Ness. Just as we reach the edge of the village there is a little dilapidated building on the right hand side of the road with an inscription over the door indicating that it was built in 1836 as a Methodist Chapel. We follow the road south out of the village and on the left hand side of the road we pass the entrance to the public water supply borehole site operated by Yorkshire Water. From the edge of the village we climb up along a grassy track to a ridge called Caukleys Bank with lovely views in every direction. To the south we're looking over Hovingham and the Howardian Hills. To the North we're looking to Kirkbymoorside and the North York Moors, whilst to the East we're looking across the Vale of Pickering to the Yorkshire wolds beyond Malton. There are a few seats strategically placed along the ridge so you can sit for a while and enjoy the scenery. We continue across the Hovingham to Nunnington road and turn North along a path across the fields to the Church of All Saints on the Southern edge of Nunnington. Here there is the tomb of a knight. The stone lid of the tomb is decorated with a lifesize statue of the knight with a dog at his feet. The knight is not identified but there is a wonderful story about him. Apparently he was pledged to complete a brave deed before he could marry and there was a creature variously described as a dragon or giant worm with poisonous bite and even worse breath! Worse still the monster healed its wounds very quickly. The knight fought the monster and managed to hack bits off it which he commanded his dog to carry off so that the monster could not heal itself. In this way he finally defeated and killed the dragon. His dog jumped up to lick his face and both of them died from the dragon's poison on the dogs face, and were buried at the church. What events really lie behind such a tale? I wish I knew. We continue down the village street past the church and on the left hand side of the road just past a farm entrance is a walled garden and if you peer over the wall there is a huge walnut tree, by far the largest one I have ever seen. The tree is recorded on the Ancient Tree Hunt web site and is almost 7m around the narrowest part of the base of the trunk. At that size it must be getting on for 300 years old. We follow the road through the village to complete our circular walk from Nunnington.

top of page