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Cattle grazing by the River Derwent near Barmby Barrage
Cattle grazing by the River Derwent near Barmby Barrage

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Route No. 345 - Monday 7 June 2010
Barmby Barrage, River Ouse,
Asselby, River Derwent circuit - 12km
Howden . . .

Route map from Ordnance Survey Open Space service.

Map: OS Explorer 291 Goole & Gilberdyke at 1:25000


Barmby Barrage on the River Derwent
Barmby Barrage on the River Derwent

The barrage prevents saline tidal water from the River Ouse from flowing up the River Derwent where about 2km upstream water is abstracted for the public supply. When water levels in the Ouse are high water from the River Derwent is pumped into the Ouse and in this way flood levels in the Ouse do not impact directly on levels in the Derwent.

This morning I drove to my brother-in-law, John's house in Melbourne to meet him, and our friends Charlie and Tom. We all drove in John's car to the Yorkshire Water barrage (flood gates) across the River Derwent where the Derwent joins the Ouse. The road through Barmby-on-the Marsh ends at the barrage site and there's a car park there at map ref. SE682286.

Barmby Barrage on the River Derwent
Barmby Barrage on the River Derwent

Neatly mown flood bank at the Barmby Barrage site
Neatly mown flood bank at the Barmby Barrage site

Railway swing bridge abutment that crossed the R. Ouse here
Railway swing bridge abutment that crossed the R. Ouse here

This was a steel lattice girder swing-bridge built in the mid 1800's. It pivoted about its central support on a huge caisson in mid-river (all completely demolished now). The railway carried wool imported through the Hull docks from Australia & New Zealand to the mills in the West Riding of Yorkshire.

From the car park we walked up on to the flood bank beside the River Ouse and followed the path on top of the flood bank downstream. After less than 1km we passed the massive abutments of the old railway bridge over the River Ouse.

Footpath along the River Ouse flood bank
Footpath along the River Ouse flood bank

Footpath along the River Ouse flood bank
Footpath along the River Ouse flood bank

Drax power station just across the River Ouse from Barmby-in-the-Marsh
Drax power station just across the River Ouse from Barmby-in-the-Marsh

Wind farm across the R. Ouse from our path along the flood bank
Wind farm across the R. Ouse from our path along the flood bank

Wind farm by the R. Ouse
Wind farm by the R. Ouse

Wind farm by the R. Ouse
Wind farm by the R. Ouse

We passed through a herd of cattle grazing the flood bank and after about 4km along the flood bank we came to a turning at map ref. SE718269.

As we continued along the flood bank we could see a wind farm under construction on the opposite bank. The pylons are huge structures and needed equally huge equipment for their erection.

Cattle grazing the flood bank
Cattle grazing the flood bank

Our path along the R. Ouse flood bank
Our path along the R. Ouse flood bank

The M62 viaduct over the R. Ouse below Boothferry Bridge
The M62 viaduct over the R. Ouse below Boothferry Bridge

Standing lunch break sheltering under the trees
Standing lunch break sheltering under the trees

Approaching Asselby along the track between the fields
Approaching Asselby along the track between the fields

We stood in the shelter of the trees and ate out lunch, and looking East from here we could see the M62 viaduct a little over 2km away crossing the River Ouse about 600m downstream of Boothferry Bridge. The rain eased up and we set off again following the track for about 1km into Asselby.

Here we turned sharp left to walk along a track between the fields heading directly away from the River Ouse towards the village of Assleby. The weather had been overcast all morning and now it began to rain, steady and persistent. There was a hedge and some large trees by the track and we took shelter there and managed to keep relatively dry.

The track into Asselby
The track into Asselby

Cranesbill or wild geranium by the track
Cranesbill or wild geranium by the track

Lungwort or pulmonaria by the track
Lungwort or pulmonaria by the track

Unusual finger post at Asselby
Unusual finger post at Asselby

Just beyond the village, at map ref. SE713283, we turned right off the road to walk along a track and then a path between the fields to the flood bank of the River Derwent next to the A63.

We entered the village past a very well kept allotment complete with its scarecrow. At the road in the village we turned left and followed the road out of the village.

Very neat allotment complete with scarecrow
Very neat allotment complete with scarecrow

Walking through Asselby
Walking through Asselby

Track between the fields from Asselby to the R. Derwent flood bank
Track between the fields from Asselby to the R. Derwent flood bank

Path along the R. Derwent flood bank
Path along the R. Derwent flood bank

Path along the R. Derwent flood bank
Path along the R. Derwent flood bank

We continued along the flood bank and passed several large pens of Quails. They could have been kept for their eggs or for meat, or possibly for both?

At the flood bank we turned left to walk along the top of the flood bank. Here we passed the Yorkshire Water abstraction point on the River Derwent and the huge water treatment works.

Barmby Water treatment works by the R. Derwent
Barmby Water treatment works by the R. Derwent

Path along the R. Derwent flood bank
Path along the R. Derwent flood bank

One of several large pens of quails below the flood bank
One of several large pens of quails below the flood bank

A swan on the R. Derwent
A swan on the R. Derwent

Returning to the Barmby Barrage site on the R. Derwent
Returning to the Barmby Barrage site on the R. Derwent

Charlie could not find his car keys and eventually accepted that he had dropped them at our lunch stop near Asselby John drove him home to get his spare keys and at last we could all get our cars out of John's drive and go home. Charlie drove out to Asselby and walked down to our lunch spot where amazingly he found his car keys in the long grass where he had been standing!

After about 2.5km along the River Derwent flood bank we reached the Barmby Barrage across the River Derwent and returned to the car park at the end of our walk. We all climbed back into John's car and drove back to his house where we had left our cars. It's a long narrow drive and Charlie's car was parked at the exit.

Warning sign on the R. Derwent near the barrage
Warning sign on the R. Derwent near the barrage

Returning to the car park at the Barmby Barrage site on the R. Derwent
Returning to the Barmby Barrage site car park by the R. Derwent