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Part of the original Londesborough Hall, demolished in 1819 now providing
Part of the original Londesborough Hall, demolished in 1819 now providing shelter for the deer

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Route No. 391 - Saturday 29 January 2011
Market Weighton to Pocklington
using the Wolds Way (linear walk) - 18km
Yorkshire Wolds . . .

Route map from Ordnance Survey Open Space service.

Map: OS Explorer 294 Market Weighton & Yorkshire Wolds Central at 1:25000

This route is contributed by Pete Crosby of York - Thanks Pete!


Main street in Market Weighton
Main street in Market Weighton

The Hudson Way follows the old railway track known locally as the 'Monkey Run' built by 'Railway King' George Hudson and opened in 1865.

On a dullish day we started our walk from Market Weighton having arrived by bus from York. From the centre of town we walked up the Londesborough road to the start of the Hudson Way to Beverley.

Leaving Market Weighton on the Hudson Way
Leaving Market Weighton on the Hudson Way

Fungus by the Hudson Way
Fungus by the Hudson Way

St Helen's Well
St. Helen's Well

This quarry probably played a part in the building of the railway by providing stone for embankments and became a shooting range until the second world war.

We followed this way for about 2km passing the recently restored St. Helen's Well until we met the Goodmanham road. We turned left here past the nature reserve at Rifle Butts Quarry.

St Helen's Well
St. Helen's Well

Rifle Butt's Quarry nature reserver near Goodmanham
Rifle Butt's Quarry nature reserve near Goodmanham

The church in Goodmanham
The church in Goodmanham

Old turnip chopping machine in Goodmanham
Old turnip chopping machine in Goodmanham

Heading North out of Goodmanham
Heading North out of Goodmanham

This short section of road took us uphill into the village of Goodmanham After a quick look around we continued out of the village on the Wolds Way north soon passing under a bridge from the old line to Driffield.

Old enammelled signs on Goodmanham
Old enameled signs in Goodmanham

Knomes by the path North of Goodmanham
Gnomes by the path North of Goodmanham

Looking towards Londesborough from the  track beyond Towthorpe Corner, map ref. SE877447
Looking towards Londesborough from the track beyond Towthorpe Corner, map ref. SE877447

The grounds of Londesborough Hall
The grounds of Londesborough Hall

Part of the original Londesborough Hall
Part of the original Londesborough Hall

Londesborough church
Londesborough church

Passing these shelters we entered the village noting the old Hall gate before stopping for some lunch outside the church.

We crossed the A614 and started our descent to the ponds at Londesborough Park once the home of George Hudson. The original Londesborough Hall is now no more but the deer shelters built underneath the building still survive.

The grounds of Londesborough Hall
The grounds of Londesborough Hall

The old entrance to Londesborough Hall
The old entrance to Londesborough Hall

Topiary by the sign in Londesborough
Topiary by the footpath sign in Londesborough

Seat by the lane leading out of Londesborough
Seat by the lane leading out of Londesborough

We rested briefly on a seat provided for Wolds Way walkers to admire the view.

We left the village on a road section of the Way with extensive views west towards the vale of York.

Information board by the seat
Information board by the seat

The view looking Southwest from the seat at map ref. SE864456
The view looking Southwest from the seat at map ref. SE864456

Crossing Nunburnholme Beck on the edge of the village
Crossing Nunburnholme Beck on the edge of the village

The churchyard in Nunburnholme
The churchyard in Nunburnholme

Looking back towards Nunburnholme from the climb into  Bratt Wood
Looking back towards Nunburnholme from the climb into Bratt Wood

This area is noted for red kites and as we emerged from the wood into open fields we counted seven kites circling around

The next section of the walk took us around the edge of Burnby Wold before we descended into Nunburnholme, passing the old church before following the Way to Bratt Wood.

The church in Nunburnholme
The church in Nunburnholme

Yellow aconites coming into flower by the path
Yellow aconites coming into flower by the path

Start of the path to Kilnwick Percy
Start of the path to Kilnwick Percy

Looking west towards Pocklington from the path approaching Wold Farm
Looking west towards Pocklington from the path approaching Wold Farm

The path to Kilnwick Percy
The path to Kilnwick Percy

The church at Kilnwick Percy
The church at Kilnwick Percy

The priory is now a Buddhist centre and having stopped for tea at the cafe we passed through the grounds and onto and across the Kilnwick Percy golf course following the path to Chapel Hill where we finally descended into Pocklington and our bus home - Pete Crosby

On meeting the Pocklington to Kilnwick road we turned left leaving the Wolds Way. A kilometre of road and we turned right onto the path leading us to the church of St. Helen at Kilnwick Priory.

Pony by the path to Kilnwick Percy
Pony by the path to Kilnwick Percy

Dropping down into Pocklington at the end of the walk
Dropping down into Pocklington at the end of the walk

Lake in the grounds of Kilnwick Percy Hall
Lake in the grounds of Kilnwick Percy Hall