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Coldstone Quarry seen from the sculpture standing on the quarry rim
Coldstone Quarry seen from the sculpture (Coldstone Cut) standing on the quarry rim

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Route No. 427 - Saturday 2 July 2011
Pateley Bridge, Bewerley, Coldstone Quarry,
Ashfoldside Beck, Wath, River Nidd circuit - 13km
Nidderdale (AONB) . . .

Route map from Ordnance Survey Open Space service.

Map: OS Explorer 298 Nidderdale at 1:25000

The route details and photographs were provided by Peter Crosby - Thanks Pete!


Riverside path In Pateley Bridge
Riverside path In Pateley Bridge

Bewerley village name plaque
Bewerley village name plaque

Chapel interior in Bewerley
Interior of Bewerley Grange Chapel

We passed the showground on our left and the children's playground on our right before taking the left turn to Bewerley. After a short inspection of the ancient chapel in Bewerley village, we proceeded to the small entrance gate to Fishpond Wood at map ref. SE157646.

This morning six of our walking group met up in Pateley Bridge for our monthly walk with the route to include the largest outdoor work of art in Yorkshire. We parked in the car park at map ref.SE158654, alongside the Nidd and walked back along the riverside path to cross the bridge over the River Nidd.

Childrens playground by the river in Pateley Bridge
Children's playground by the river in Pateley Bridge

Stone plaque depicting Bewerley in 1900
Stone plaque depicting Bewerley in 1900

Iron gate to Fishpond Wood
Iron gate to Fishpond Wood

Path through Fishpond Wood
Path through Fishpond Wood

The pond in Fishpond Wood
The pond in Fishpond Wood

The entrance to Fishpond Wood is an old iron gate just before the road junction. With the sun beating down we were glad of the tree cover in the woodland as we climbed steadily to emerge from the wood at White Wood Farm.

Foxglove in Fishpond Wood
Foxglove in Fishpond Wood

Climbing up from Fishpond Wood towards the road at Coldstone Quarry
Climbing up from Fishpond Wood towards the road at Coldstone Quarry

Track up to Haver Garth
Track up to Haver Garth

Track leaving Haver Garth
Track leaving Haver Garth

Ragged Robin by the road as we neared the quarry
Ragged Robin by the road as we neared the quarry

Turning right along the road almost as far as the B6265 we then went up the new track to the viewing platforms at the artwork of Coldstone Cut

From White Wood Farm we followed the path through Haver Garth, and continued through to the road east of Coldstone quarry.

Sheep in the shade
Sheep in the shade near Haver Garth

Hay meadow near Moor View Farm
Hay meadow near Moor View Farm

The track above Gillbeck Farm
The track above Gillbeck Farm

Heading for the road at map ref. SE132638
Heading for the road at map ref. SE132638 near Coldstone Quarry
Entering Coldstone Cut monumental sculpture
Entering Coldstone Cut monumental sculpture
Looking over the top of Coldston Cut sculpture
Looking over the top of Coldstone Cut sculpture
Viewing platform in front of the sculpture
Viewing platform in front of the sculpture
The 'Street' through the sculpture
The 'Street' through the sculpture

Coldstone Quarry seen from the Coldstone Cut sculpture
Coldstone Quarry seen from the Coldstone Cut sculpture

Track past Coldstonefold farm
Track past Coldstonefold farm

On the track to Heathfield
On the track to Heathfield

Track climbing up to Heathfield
Track climbing up to Heathfield

Turning right onto the Nidderdale Way for about 400metres we then took a path left across to Mosscarr Bottom over the footbridge and north on the bridleway through a caravan site until meeting a tarmac track where a short left turn of about 20metres takes us to the bridleway across to Heathfield.

After enjoying this splendid viewpoint and viewing platform for the working quarry we walked back down to the road turned left and crossed the B6265 and took the path down to Partridge Garth stopping nearby to lunch overlooking the next part of our route over to Heathfield. At Coldstone Fold we turned right onto the bridleway down through Coldstonesfold Farm to Hillend.

Lower down the track past Coldstonefold farm
Lower down the track past Coldstonefold farm

Track up to Heathfield from Mosscarr Bottom
Track up to Heathfield from Mosscarr Bottom

Looking towards Pateley Bridge from Heathfield
Looking towards Pateley Bridge from Heathfield

The 'Tin Tabernacle' chapel
The 'Tin Tabernacle' chapel
Swallows on wire near Spring Hill
Swallows on wire near Spring Hill

Herdwick sheep at Spring Hill
Herdwick sheep at Spring Hill

Beginning the descent to Wath Bridge
Beginning the descent to Wath Bridge

Approaching the barn just before Wath Bridge
Approaching the barn just before Wath Bridge

After the 'Tin Tabernacle' chapel we took the footpath left through Spring Hill and over the hill to descend down to Wath Bridge.

We passed through Heathfield and then took a right turn down the road past the 'tin tabernacle' chapel.

Weather station at spring Hill
Weather station at spring Hill

View to Gouthwaite reservoir on the descent to Wath Bridge
View to Gouthwaite reservoir on the descent to Wath Bridge

Inscribed lintel over the barn door
Inscribed lintel over the barn door

The barn just before Wath Bridge
The barn just before Wath Bridge

Footbridge on the right just over Wath Bridge
Footbridge on the right just over Wath Bridge

Mating Ringlet butterflies by the path
Mating Ringlet butterflies by the path

Part of this section of path was once the rail track up the dale constructed for use when the dams at Scar House were being constructed. Back in Pateley Bridge our finish was conveniently near a tea shop by the river to round off the walk.

After crossing Wath bridge over the River Nidd, we immediately took a right turn over a footbridge and followed the River Nidd back to our start at Pateley Bridge.

Approaching Wath Bridge
Approaching Wath Bridge

On the riverside route back to Pateley Bridge
On the riverside route back to Pateley Bridge

Serene river Nidd on the way back to Pateley Bridge
Serene river Nidd on the way back to Pateley Bridge

Background Notes:
This is a circulr route of 13km, just over 8 miles, from the riverside in Pateley Bridge. The route crosses the road bridge over the River Nidd and goes to the village of Bewerley where in the 1200's there was a Grange of Fountains Abbey, a kind of outpost used by lay-brothers and monks in connection with their lead mining particularly around Greenhow. The Bewerley Grange Chapel dating from about 1495 is worth a visit in Bewerley village. Relief carvings of the initials M H on the south side of the chapel stand for Marmaduke Huby who was the Abbot of Fountains Abbey from 1495 to 1526 and his motto, which means 'Honour and glory are God's alone', is in Latin above the east window. The chapel is open to visitors during daylight hours. At the end of the village our route goes through an iron gate on the right of the road into Fishpond wood. The pond in this pretty wood was built to breed fish as a food source for the residents of the Grange. Fountains Abbey and Byland Abbey became very rich from their huge land holdings and mineral wealth. They had such a grip on the lead trade that in 1502 the Merchant Adventures of York complained to Marmaduke Huby, the Abbot of Fountains that "his buying and selling lead and other merchandise as a free merchant was contrary to God's laws and man's, you being a spiritual man and of religion, and so your occupying is great damage and hurt to us merchants in these parts". I don't know how the dispute was resolved, maybe it wasn't until Henry 8th came along and dissolved the monasteries, starting about 10 years after Marmaduke Huby's time as Abbot of Fountains. From Bewerley we climb up to Coldstone Quarry at Green How. The name Coldstone is derived from a Norse word and means just what it says, being a comment on the harsh weather up on top of Greenhow. Our approach to the quarry is along a wide gravel track, fairly steep in places, to a huge monumental sculpture on the edge of the quarry, called Coldstone Cut. The sculpture was opened to the public on 16 September last year 2010 and consists of a narrow 'Street' between high walls of large rough limestone blocks with narrow passages off to either side which spiral up to two high viewing platforms overlooking both the quarry and the surrounding countryside. On my web site there's a link to a wonderful aerial photo of the sculpture on the artist's web site. If you just want to see the sculpture there is a carpark near the top of Greenhow Bank at the Toft Gate Lime Kiln with access onto the gravel path to the sculpture. From the quarry sculpture the route crosses the Greenhow Bank road and heads down to a valley called Ashfold Side, to join the Nidderdale Way route. We follow the Nidderdale Way through a hamlet called Heathfield where there is a green painted corrugated iron chapel known as the 'Tin Tabernacle'. From the mid 1800's prefabricated chapels made from galvanised corrugated iron sheets were produced and exported all over the world and were known as Tin Tabernacles. Here we leave the Nidderdale Way briefly and head for Wath on the River Nidd where we re-join the Nidderdale Way and follow it along the riverside. This last part of the route from Wath back into Pateley Bridge follows the route of a single track railway that ran between Pateley Bridge and Lofthouse and linked up with a narrow gauge railway at Lofthouse that supplied the dam construction sites an Angram and later at Scar House from the 1890's through to the 1930's. Once you're back in Pately there are plenty of cafes just to round off your day on the hills.
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