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The monument on Latterbarrow above Hawkshead
The monument on Latterbarrow above Hawkshead

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Route No. 468 - Saturday 19 May 2012
Hawkshead ferry, Claife Station, Claife Heights, Latterbarrow, Hawkshead linear walk - 11km
English Lake District . . .

Route map from Ordnance Survey Open Space service.

Map: OS Explorer OL7 The English Lakes South-eastern area


Lake Widermere from the National Trust car park
Lake Windermere from the National Trust car park

National Trust gateway to the 'Claife Station'
National Trust gateway to the 'Claife Station'

Pathway to the Claife Station
Pathway to the Claife Station

We followed the path from the National Trust gateway, along a wide track climbing gently up the hillside winding its way around a headland with impressive views across Windermere opening up as we climbed. After about 250m we came to the ruins of the building at the Claife Station. These 'Stations' were selected view points around the Lake District where fashionable visitors in the late 1700's and 1800's would come to observe the 'Sublime' landscape as a means of self improvement. The building at Claife Station offered accommodation and a dining room with carefully arranged vistas down Lake Windermere through the large bay windows.

This weekend we are staying with a group of friends at a large holiday cottage in a hamlet called Knipe Point near Hawkshead in the English Lake District. Today we all drove to Hawkshead and left one car there in the main public car park. Then we all drove in the remaining cars to a National Trust car park on the edge of Lake Windermere at map ref. SD388960 a few hundred metres from the Bowness/Hawkshead ferry terminal. From the car park we followed the road along the lakeside towards the ferry for about 400m. Here we turned right off the road through a gateway in an elaborate stone wall with a National Trust plaque marking it as the entrance to the 'Claife Station'.

Windermere near the Bowness/Hawkshead ferry
Windermere near the Bowness/Hawkshead ferry

Pathway to the Claife Station
Pathway to the Claife Station

The ruins of the building at the Claife Station
The ruins of the building at the Claife Station

Looking across Windermere from the Claife Station
Looking across Windermere from the Claife Station

Climbing up through the woods from the Claife Station
Climbing up through the woods from the Claife Station

Windermere through the trees from the top of the woods
Windermere through the trees from the top of the woods

There was a grumble about the climb going on and on but the woodland is very pretty and I think that the landscape is well worth the effort of the climb.

From Claife Station we followed the path up through the woods. The path climbed quite steeply up the hillside for almost 300m to the edge of the woodland.

Climbing up through the woods from the Claife Station
Climbing up through the woods from the Claife Station

Bluebells by a mossy tree trunk
Bluebells by a mossy tree trunk

The path along the top edge of the woodland above Lake Windermere
The path along the top edge of the woodland above Lake Windermere

Bluebells by the woodland path
Bluebells by the woodland path

Finger post at the junction in the tracks
Finger post at the junction in the tracks

At the finger post we turned right along another walled track for almost 600m. We passed a pretty little pond in the pasture on our left and shortly afterwards we kept right at a fork in the track and came to a gate from the grassland back into the woods.

We continued along the hill top following a path in the edge of the woodland to a walled track at map ref. SD383961. Here we turned left to follow the track for about 300m to a junction. There was a finger post at the junction and the arm pointing to our right indicated that the route led to Latterbarrow & Hawkshead via the 'White Post' route.

Following the walled track
Following the walled track

We passed a pretty little pond in the grassland
We passed a pretty little pond in the grassland

The gate from the grassland back into the woods
The gate from the grassland back into the woods

Our turning at a finger post in a clear felled area
Our turning at a finger post in a clear felled area

The felled timber was about 50 years old
The felled timber was about 50 years old

Here we turned left and followed the path through the felled area over the hill top and re-entered the woodland about 300m from the finger post.

We followed the path through the woods for about 1km to another white topped finger post at map ref. SD383972 in a large clear felled area that looked rather desolate.

Path through the woodland
Path through the woodland

the path through a rather desolate clear felled area
The path through a rather desolate clear felled area

Fallen finger post on top of the ridge
Fallen finger post on top of the ridge

The path through a rather desolate clear felled area
The path through a rather desolate clear felled area

Path along the rocky hill top through the clear felled area
Path along the rocky hill top through the clear felled area

Heading for the trig point through the woods
Heading for the trig point through the woods

We stopped here for our lunch break in a pleasant clearing in the woodland.

We followed the path through the woodland to a trig point at map ref. SD382973.

The trig point at 269m AOD
The trig point at 269m AOD

Looking to our lunch stop from the trig point
Looking to our lunch stop from the trig point

Leaving the trig point on the woodland path
Leaving the trig point on the woodland path

Forest access road by a small lake
Forest access road by a small lake

A violet by the path
A violet by the path

Here a bridleway crossed our track with a small finger post at the junction. The most direct route to Latterbarrow was to our left but we continued straight on to follow a track heading down hill through the woods for another kilometer to map ref. SD371995.

After our lunch break we continued along the path from the trig point down to a forest access road at map ref. SD382976 next to a small lake. We turned off the forest road along a path at the end of the lake. We walked through the woodland along this path for a little over 1km to map ref. SD375986.

Reaching a forest access road by a small lake
Reaching a forest access road by a small lake

Turning off the forest road to a path at the end of the lake
Turning off the forest road to a path at the end of the lake

Another clear felled area as we headed down the hillside
Another clear felled area as we headed down the hillside

The track down the hillside through the woods
The track down the hillside through the woods

The track down the hillside through the woods
The track down the hillside through the woods

Stile at the start of the climb up to Latterbarrow
Stile at the start of the climb up to Latterbarrow

Coming out of the woods to the open hillside of Latterbarrow
Coming out of the woods to the open hillside of Latterbarrow

Superb views all round from the monument and we stood there along with numerous other walkers just taking in the scenery for quite a while.

Here the track we had been following turned right continuing down hill, but we turned left over a stile. From the stile we begin the climb up through the woodland for about 200m then on up the open hillside to the monument on top of Latterbarrow at map ref. SD367991.

Path up through the woods to Latterbarrow
Path up through the woods to Latterbarrow

The monument on top of Latterbarrow
The monument on top of Latterbarrow

Looking South-west from Latterbarrow monument to Esthwaite Water
Looking South-west from Latterbarrow monument to Esthwaite Water

Beginning the descent from Latterbarrow monument
Beginning the descent from Latterbarrow monument

The delicate pink flowers of lousewort
The delicate pink flowers of lousewort

Steep descent on the west side of Latterbarrow
Steep descent on the west side of Latterbarrow

Gate to the road at the bottom of Latterbarrow
Gate to the road at the bottom of Latterbarrow

At the lane we turned left to walk along it for about 50m to a junction where we turned right to continue along another lane.

After enjoying the views we set off along a path down the steep eastern face of Latterbarrow for about 600m to a narrow country lane at map ref. SD362992.

Steep descent on the west side of Latterbarrow
Steep descent on the west side of Latterbarrow

Nearing the road at the bottom of Latterbarrow
Nearing the road at the bottom of Latterbarrow

The lane at the bottom of Latterbarrow
The lane at the bottom of Latterbarrow

Stile into the National Trust bluebell wood
Wonky stile into the National Trust bluebell wood

Path through the National Trust bluebell wood
Path through the National Trust bluebell wood

The wood was carpeted with bluebells that were in full flower. It was a warm sunny afternoon and everything in the wood just looked perfect. We followed the path to the edge of the wood at map ref. SD357986 where we joined a public footpath.

We continued along the lane for about 250m to map ref. SD359992. Here we turned right off the lane to follow a permissive path through some National Trust woodland. What a treat this turned out to be!

The National Trust bluebell wood
The National Trust bluebell wood

The National Trust bluebell wood
The National Trust bluebell wood

Bluebells studded with white stitchwort flowers in the National Trust wood
Bluebells studded with white stitchwort flowers in the National Trust wood

Public footpath out of the National Trust wood
Public footpath out of the National Trust wood

Path across the fields back to Hawkshead
Path across the fields back to Hawkshead

After about 250m we crossed an access road and continued along the path for almost 500m to the B5286 at map ref. SD352983 on the edge of Hawkshead.

From the wood this path led us out to a small access road where we turned right off the access road to follow a public footpath across the fields heading roughly westwards.

Track away from the National Trust wood
Track away from the National Trust wood

Path across the fields back to Hawkshead
Path across the fields back to Hawkshead

Path across the fields back to Hawkshead
Path across the fields back to Hawkshead

The public footpath continues into Hawkshead village
The public footpath continues into Hawkshead village

They then drove to collect the other cars from the National Trust car park where we had started our walk. We all then drove back to Hawkshead to collect everyone and return to our holiday cottage at Knipe Point. The whole route had been 11km and it had taken us four and a half hours to walk including our various stops.

We crossed the main road, the B5286, and continued through the narrow streets of the town to a very nice tea shop. From there the car drivers walked to the main car park to the car we had left there this morning.

Typical narrow street in Hawkshead
Typical narrow street in Hawkshead

I had my first real experience of the Lake District in August 1960 when I spent a month at the Eskdale Outward Bound School and since then I have been up many of the highest peaks, but now my wonky old knees have limited my walking and it has been a surprisingly pleasant time discovering some very attractive, easier, lower routes that the Lake District and other places have to offer. Our two walks this weekend have been excellent examples of this.

Our tea shop in one of the narrow streets of Hawkshead
Our tea shop in one of the narrow streets of Hawkshead