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Welcome to Marton-le-Moor
Welcome to Marton-le-Moor

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Route No. 542 - Easter Sunday 20 April 2014
Marton-le-Moor, Cana Barn, Well Lane, Cocklake Lane,
Moor Lane, Anthony Lane, Whitegate Lane circuit - 6km
Boroughbridge Walking Festival . . .

Route map from Ordnance Survey Open Space service.

Map: OS Explorer 299 Ripon & Boroughbridge


The Meeting Room on the edge of Marton-le-Moor
The Meeting Room on the edge of Marton-le-Moor

Setting off along Whitegates Lane
Setting off along Whitegate Lane

Walking along Cana Lane
Walking along Cana Lane

Malcolm lives in Marton-le-Moor and had an obvious pride in his home village and an enthusiasm for the village and its surroundings. The information used in these notes is taken from Malcolm's commentary as we walked the route. From the Meeting Room we all set off to walk along Whitegate Lane to its junction with Cana Lane.

The Boroughbridge Walking Festival is taking place in and around Boroughbridge for the whole of Easter week. The festival offers an open invitation to anyone to join any of the free guided walks of the festival. To-day's walk started at 2.00pm, from the Meeting Room on Whitegate Lane in Marton-le-Moor. Almost 40 people assembled at the Meeting Room and were greeted by Malcolm, our guide for the walk.

Our turning into Cana Lane
Our turning into Cana Lane

Turning off the lane to see Cana Barn
Turning off the lane to see Cana Barn

Our group assembles at Cana Barn
Our group assembles at Cana Barn

Stone plaque over the door at Cana Barn
Stone plaque over the door at Cana Barn

Walking a few metres along Lead Street
Walking a few metres along Lead Street

Each of these henges is a massive structure requiring a substantial workforce to build over an extended period but little seems to be known about them. The barn and the nearby henge occupy an elevated position with a view across the Vale of Mowbray to the Yorkshire Dales National Park to the west and a view to the Cleveland Hills on the edge of the North York Moors National Park to the east. Alas, even though today was fine and sunny, there was a heavy haze in the distance and we saw nothing of these fine views!

At the junction we turned right to follow Cana Lane for a little over 1km to a right hand bend in the lane at map ref. SE364717. Off the left hand side of the road at the bend is an old stone barn (built in the 1820's) with an illegible, much weathered inscription plaque over the door. This is Cana Barn. In the field just beyond the barn is the site of a stone age henge. Little of this ancient earthwork remains now. It was constructed around 6000 years ago and is thought to be part of the same huge ritual landscape that includes the three great Thornbury Henges about 12km to the northeast and the henge just 2km away on Hutton Moor.

Leaving the Cana Barn site
Leaving the Cana Barn site

Well Lane heading towards the A1
Well Lane heading towards the A1

Arriving at the overgrown entrance to a Staton air raid shelter from World War 2
Arriving at the overgrown entrance to a Stanton air raid shelter from World War 2

Making our way along Well Lane
Making our way along Well Lane

The A1 is a motorway now and quite a major physical barrier but in the 1940's it was simply a trunk road which presented no obstacle to cross from the airfield to the shelter which was designed to hold around 50 people. The brick entrances lead into a tunnel built from reinforced concrete units. It's one of a range of air raid shelters manufactured by Stantons of Ilkeston in Derbyshire and widely used at military sites during WW2. (The link with their iron foundry expertise is that they manufactured the iron moulds that were used to cast the reinforced concrete units for the shelters.

From the Cana Barn we returned to Cana Lane and followed it around the right hand bend for about 300m to a left hand bend. Here we turned right off Cana Lane onto a track called Lead Street. After only about 50m we turned left off Lead Street to follow another track called Well Lane along the edge of the fields towards the A1. After about 500m the lane turned to the right and ran parallel to the A1 which was about 300m away to the left of the lane. Along this lane on the right hand side we came to the brick entrances to a World War 2 air raid shelter. It was associated with the war time military Dishforth Airfield just across the A1 from here.

Making our way along Well Lane
Making our way along Well Lane

The overgrown brick entrance to the reinforced concrete WW2 Stanton air raid shelter designed for 50 men from Dishforth airfield
The overgrown brick entrance to the reinforced concrete WW2 Stanton air raid shelter designed for 50 men from Dishforth airfield

Walking along Guy Lane
Walking along Guy Lane

Cocklake Lane beside a newly sown field
Cocklake Lane beside a newly sown field

After about 1km we came to a road where we continued straight ahead for another 300m to a sharp left hand bend in the road at map ref. SE380699. In the field ahead on the bend there was an array of farm machinery planting the huge field with potatoes.

We continued along Well Lane to a road called Guy Lane, at map ref. SE372714. We walked along Guy Lane for about 400m to a right hand bend in the lane. On the bend we kept straight on leaving Guy Lane and following a track called Cocklake Lane between the fields.

Joining Cocklake Lane at the road junction
Joining Cocklake Lane at the road junction

Our turning on to Moor Lane
Our turning on to Moor Lane

Skelton Mill seen across the fields from Moor Lane
Skelton Mill seen across the fields from Moor Lane

Waiting for stragglers at the top of Moor lane
Waiting for stragglers at the top of Moor lane

None of the three parish councils wanted to pay for the vagrant's burial. Skelton council agreed to do the job provided they were given the windmill. The other parties agreed and so it's now Skelton Mill - so the story goes. Numerous flint tools and implements have been found on this hill over the years as the land was worked, dating back to the stone age when the nearby henges were constructed.

We turned right at the bend to walk along a track called Moor Lane. Before all the boundary changes in 1974 the old boundary between the North and West Ridings of Yorkshire ran along Moor Lane. As we walked up Moor Lane there was a windmill across the field to our left. This is Skelton Mill. The story tells that a vagrant was found dead on this hill in the late 1700's on the boundary between three parishes, Marton-le-Moor, Skelton-on-Ure and Kirby Hill.

Heading back to Marton-le-Moor along Anthony Lane
Heading back to Marton-le-Moor along Anthony Lane

Gathering the group together at the edge of the village
Gathering the group together at the edge of the village

Turning into Whitegates Lane in the village
Turning into Whitegate Lane in the village

There were some light refreshments provided there just to round off a very pleasant afternoon walk. Thanks Malcolm for your knowledge and enthusiasm. The whole walk was about 6km and it took around 2 hours for the group of almost 40 people to walk it.

At the top of Moor Lane we came to a metalled road and turned right to walk along Anthony Lane back to the edge of Marton-le-Moor. At the road junction, map ref. SE368702, we turned right into the village and then left into Whitegate Lane. We followed this lane back to the Meeting Room and the end of the walk.

Welcome to Marton-le-Moor
Welcome back to Marton-le-Moor

Whitegates Lane heading back to the Meeting Room
Whitegate Lane heading back to the Meeting Room


Arriving back at the Meeting Room at the end of the walk

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