white horse logo

The wheat harvest was well under way on our walk through the Howardian Hills
The wheat harvest was well under way on our walk through the Howardian Hills

Menu:

National Parks

| 2001 walks | 2002 walks | 2003 walks | 2004 walks |
| 2005 walks | 2006 walks | 2007 walks | 2008 walks |
| 2009 walks | 2010 walks | 2011 walks | 2012 walks |
| 2013 walks | 2014 walks | 2015 walks | 2016 walks |
| 2017 walks | 1993-2000 library | Find a Route |
| A few Routes to print out | Request a Route... |

Route No. 590 - Thursday 27 August 2015
Crayke, Foss Walk route, Marton Abbey Farm,
Seaves, Launds Farm circuit - 11km
Howardian Hills . . .

Route map from Ordnance Survey Open Space service.

Map: OS Explorer 299 Ripon & Boroughbridge
and OS Explorer 300 Howardian Hills & Malton
the route overlaps the join between these two maps


Looking up the hill from the Durham Ox pub to the church on the hill top in Crayke
Looking up the hill from the Durham Ox pub to the church on the hill top in Crayke

The main street through Crayke
The main street through Crayke

Leaving Crayke along the Fass Walk route
Leaving Crayke along the Foss Walk route

Crossing the wheat fields south east of Crayke
Crossing the wheat fields south east of Crayke

Here (at map ref. SE 562 705) we turned right off the road to follow the route of the Foss Walk out of the village. It was a well walked route across the wheat fields where the crop looked to be about ready to harvest. After about 500m across the fields of wheat we came to Mosswood Lane at map ref. SE 566 701.

This morning my friend, Jim, and I drove to Crayke, a village only about 3km from Easingwold where we live. We parked on the roadside on the street that goes up the hill from the Durham Ox pub to the church on the hill top. From our parking spot we walked down the hill to the pub and then turned left to walk along the road through the village for about 70m.

Leaving Crayke along the Fass Walk route
Leaving Crayke along the Foss Walk route

Leaving Crayke along the Fass Walk route
Leaving Crayke along the Foss Walk route

Sign where the route meets Mosswood Lane
Sign where the route meets Mosswood Lane

Looking back to Crayke along the route of the Foss Walk across the wheat fields
Looking back to Crayke along the route of the Foss Walk across the wheat fields

Walking along Mosswood Lane
Walking along Mosswood Lane

Bridleway around Mosswood House
Bridleway around Mosswood House

Heading for Marton Park farm across the fields
Heading for Marton Park farm across the fields

We were still following the route of the Foss Walk and beyond Mosswood House we continued through more fields, where the wheat had just been harvested, for about 1.2km to Marton Park Farm.

We turned left here to walk along the lane for about 200m. Then we turned left off the lane where a bridleway has been diverted around Mosswood House.

Turning off Mosswood lane onto a bridleway
Turning off Mosswood lane onto a bridleway

Route of the Foss Walk from Mosswood House
Route of the Foss Walk from Mosswood House

Free range hen and brood at Marton Park farm
Free range hen and brood at Marton Park farm

Looking back along the track through Marton Park farm
Looking back along the track through Marton Park farm

Meeting the B1363 from the Marton Park farm access road
Meeting the B1363 from the Marton Park farm access road

Passing Marton Abbey farm along Harryfield Lane
Passing Marton Abbey farm along Harryfield Lane

Following the route of the Foss Walk along Harryfield Lane
Following the route of the Foss Walk along Harryfield Lane

In the field beyond the farm there was a herd of cattle with sturdy well grown calves lying across the track. We decided to go around the herd rather than following the track through the middle of them. A few of then stood up as we passed by but they all remained calm, but I'm not sure that it would have been so easy if there had been a dog with us. About 500m past Marton Abbey Farm at map ref. SE 588 690 we turned left off Harryfield Lane, leaving the route of the Foss Walk.

The Foss Walk led us through the farm and along the farm access road out to the B1363 (York to Helmsley road). At the road we turned right and then after only a few metres we turned left off the road still following the route of the Foss Walk along the farm access road towards Marton Abbey Farm, on the site of the former Marton Priory. We passed in front of the farm along a track called Harryfield Lane.

The access road to Marton Abbey farm from the B1363
The access road to Marton Abbey farm from the B1363

Looking back to Marton Abbey Farm along Harryfield Lane
Looking back to Marton Abbey Farm along Harryfield Lane

Following the route of the Foss Walk along Harryfield Lane
Following the route of the Foss Walk along Harryfield Lane

Leaving the route of the Foss Walk and Harryfield Lane behind
Leaving the route of the Foss Walk and Harryfield Lane behind

The track heading north east towards some farm buildings
The track heading north east towards some farm buildings


Heading north east from the farm buildings

On the far side of the hedge is a tarmac farm access road to Spella Farm, but at the hedge we turned left and followed the footpath between the hedge and the wheat crop along the field boundary.

We followed a public footpath along a farm access track around a group of farm buildings and between more wheat fields to a hedge along the field boundary at map ref. SE 593 694.

The track heading north east towards some farm buildings
The track heading north east towards some farm buildings

We turned left on the path between the hedge & the field
We turned left on the path between the hedge & the field

Most of the way our route took us through fields of wheat
Most of the way our route took us through fields of wheat

Overgrown field corner but there is a way through
Overgrown field corner but there is a way through

Gap in the hedge - there's even a marker post
Gap in the hedge - there's even a marker post

The next gap in the hedge was easier to find
The next gap in the hedge was easier to find

Our path followed the hedge all the way
Our path followed the hedge all the way

The path here also follows the field boundary round the corner of the field and does not cut the corner as shown on the map. This seems to be an informal arrangement but it seems to me to be better for everyone. At one point a buzzard took off from a tree top by the path and made off at low level across the field. I tried to get a photo but failed completely to zoom on to the bird.

We continued along this path for about 1.7km to map ref. SE 594 709 near Low Farm. Along the way the path makes a couple of slightly awkward turns through the hedge, particularly at map ref. SE 591 698 where the corner of the field is overgrown but there is in fact a fairly easy way through and at map ref SE 591 706 where the path goes through a gap in the hedge.

Looking for the gap in the hedge
Looking for the gap in the hedge

Our path followed the hedge all the way
Our path followed the hedge all the way


A buzzard took off as Jim passed by & it flew low across the field towards me - a wonderful sight!

Our path followed the hedge all the way to Low Farm
Our path followed the hedge all the way to Low Farm

Next to Low Farm we joined a bridleway along a wide grassy track
Next to Low Farm we joined a bridleway along a wide grassy track

Bridleway between Low Farm & Seaves
Bridleway between Low Farm & Seaves

Wall Brown butterfly basking in the sun by the track
Wall Brown butterfly basking in the sun by the track

Overgrown part of the bridleway between Low Farm & Seaves
Overgrown part of the bridleway between Low Farm & Seaves

At the road we turned left and walked along the road for about 200m and then turned right off the road on to a farm access road.

At the bridleway near Low Farm we turned left and walked along the bridleway for about 800m to the B1363 at map ref. SE 585 714.

Bridleway between Low Farm & Seaves
Bridleway between Low Farm & Seaves

Bridleway between Low Farm & Seaves
Bridleway between Low Farm & Seaves

Peacock butterfly by the track
Peacock butterfly by the track

Sign post at the B1363 at Seaves
Sign post at the B1363 at Seaves

The B1363 can be quite busy
The B1363 can be quite busy

Approaching the B1363 & Seaves along the bridleway>
Approaching the B1363 & Seaves along the bridleway

Leaving the B1363 along a farm access road
Leaving the B1363 along a farm access road

Following the acess road towards Bumper Castle
Following the access road towards Bumper Castle

Path through the trees by-passing Bumper Castle
Path through the trees by-passing Bumper Castle

We turned left at the access road and followed it for about 250m to the entrance to a private house called Bumper Castle. Here the path passed around the outside of the garden of Bumper Castle. On the southern side of the site there were two very bouncy, noisy red setters that fortunately seemed to be well trained to stay in the garden.

The first 10m of the access road was between hedges, then at the start of a field there were signs indicating that there is no right of way along the access road past the houses. Instead the path cuts across the large field with a good crop of grass waiting to be cut. Seems a bit odd to me but we made our way across the grass trampling a path through it until we rejoined the access road on the other side of the field.

Following the right of way across the field
Following the right of way across the field

Leaving the access road to by-pass Bumper Castle
Leaving the access road to by-pass Bumper Castle


A female Southern Hawker dragon fly-male has pale blue marks

From the trees around Bumper Castle the path leads out into the fields again
From the trees around Bumper Castle the path leads out into the fields again

Path from Bumper Castle to Launds Farm
Path from Bumper Castle to Launds Farm

Path from Bumper Castle to Launds Farm
Path from Bumper Castle to Launds Farm

Looking back to Launds farm - dogs stopped at the gate
Looking back to Launds farm - dogs stopped at the gate

They were very noisy with a ferocious appearance, but kept a short distance away. As we walked along the farm access road leaving the farm behind the dogs stayed at the farm and the barking gradually subsided. From the farm we followed the farm access road for about 350m to a bend in the access road at map ref. SE 569 708.

We continued along the path across the fields for about 800m from Bumper Castle to Launds Farm, a very neat well kept establishment. The path passes the farm along the southern side and then joins the farm access drive the west of the farm. There were two loose farm dogs, border collie type.

Path from Bumper Castle to Launds Farm
Path from Bumper Castle to Launds Farm

Approaching Launds farm to be greeted by two loose dogs
Approaching Launds farm to be greeted by two loose dogs

Leaving Launds Farm along the access road
Leaving Launds Farm along the access road

Leaving Launds Farm along the access road
Leaving Launds Farm along the access road

Joining the Crayke Estate Walk across the fields
Joining the Crayke Estate Walk across the fields

Permissive path across the fields
Permissive path across the fields

Curlew mosaic on the Crayke Estate Walk
Curlew mosaic on the Crayke Estate Walk

At the sewage works we turned right and followed the concrete sewage works access road out to the main street in Crayke at map ref. SE 563707.

Just around the bend we turned left off the access road to follow a permissive path along the edge of the field for about 450m to the Crayke village sewage works. (This permissive path is part of the Crayke Estate Millennium Walk)

Well known local farmer riding his bull
Well known local farmer riding his bull

Permissive path across the fields
Permissive path across the fields

Following the sewage works access road into Crayke
Following the sewage works access road into Crayke

Crayke village sewage works by the path
Crayke village sewage works by the path

Approaching the main street in Crayke
Approaching the main street in Crayke

Heading back along the main street in Crayke
Heading back along the main street in Crayke

At the road we turned left and walked along the road back to the Durham Ox pub and then up the hill on the right back to the car and the end of the walk. The whole route had been 11km and it had taken us almost four hours to walk.

When we reached the road there was a stall opposite with all kinds of home grown produce. Jim and I both bought a large bag of beetroots that were well received at home by our respective wives.

There were all kinds of home grown produce on sale at this stall
All kinds of home grown produce on sale at this stall

Village church at the top of the hill
Village church at the top of the hill

The Durham Ox on the mian street in Crayke seen from our parking spot
The Durham Ox on the main street in Crayke seen from our parking spot

Top of Page