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Approaching the two farms at Bordley along the footpath from the south west
Approaching the two farms at Bordley along the footpath from the south west

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Route No. 631 - Thursday 21 July 2016
Malham Moor Lane, Mastiles Lane,
Lee Gate Farm, Bordley circuit - 8km
Yorkshire Dales . . .

Route map from Ordnance Survey Open Space service.

Map: OS Explorer OL2 Yorkshire Dales Southern & Western areas


Our parking spot by the cattle grid on Malham Moor Lane at map ref. SD 951 653
Our parking spot by the cattle grid on Malham Moor Lane at map ref. SD 951 653

Setting off along Malham Moor Lane
Setting off along Malham Moor Lane

Around 4km from Threshfield we crossed a cattle grid where the road became unfenced. We parked here just off the tarmac next to the dry stone wall at map ref. SD 951 652. From our parking spot we walked along the road for about 350m dropping down to the bottom of the field where the public road ends.

This morning my friend, Jim, and I drove out to Threshfield on the western bank of the River Wharfe opposite Grassington. From Threshfield we drove west past Skirethorns and north west along a narrow lane called Wood Lane. We continued driving along the lane climbing up to Malham Moor where the lane is called Malham Moor Lane.

The public road ends at this gateway
The public road ends at this gateway

Turning right to follow the track up to Mastiles Gate
Turning right to follow the track up to Mastiles Gate

Following the track up to Mastiles Gate
Following the track up to Mastiles Gate

The sign post at Mastiles Gate
The sign post at Mastiles Gate

After about 700m we came to Mastiles Gate on Mastiles Lane at map ref. SD 944 661. To our right we could see the walled track of Mastiles Lane coming up from Kilnsey in Wharfedale.

From the end of the public road we continued through the gateway and after about 30m we turned right and followed a bridleway along a track next to the wall on our right.

Continuing along the track up to Mastiles Gate
Continuing along the track up to Mastiles Gate

Looking north east along Mastiles Lane towards Kilnsey
Looking north east along Mastiles Lane towards Kilnsey

Looking south east from Mastiles Lane to Elbolton Hill, a reef knoll, in Wharfedale
Looking south east from Mastiles Lane to Elbolton Hill (a reef knoll) in Wharfedale

Following Mastiles Lane south west
Following Mastiles Lane south west

Gate on Mastiles Lane
Gate on Mastiles Lane

About 700m from Mastiles Gate we came to a few small fields on both side of Mastiles Lane and some small farm out buildings.

At Mastiles Gate we turned left and walked south west along Mastiles Lane. There was a lovely view to our left looking down into Wharfedale with the conical shape of Elbolton Hill (a reef knoll) coming into view.

Heading south west along Mastiles Lane
Heading south west along Mastiles Lane

A walled section of Mastiles Lane
A walled section of Mastiles Lane

Large boulder built into the wall (the shape looks to me like a seal sitting up & laughing)
Large boulder built into the wall (the shape looks to me like a seal sitting up & laughing)

Turning left off Mastiles lane onto a track leading to Malham
Turning left off Mastiles lane onto a track leading to Malham

Track by the fence across a sheep pasture
Track by the fence across a sheep pasture

We walked along this track for about 800m. The fence on our left had now become a dry stone wall and the field came to a point here at its southern extremity.

After another 700m we came to a track crossing Mastiles Lane at map ref. SD 930 655. Here we turned left off Mastiles Lane and followed a bridleway along a track next to the fence across a large sheep pasture.

Track by the fence across a sheep pasture
Track by the fence across a sheep pasture

Nearing the southern corner of the sheep pasture
Nearing the southern corner of the sheep pasture

Gate from the sheep pasture to a walled track
Gate from the sheep pasture to a walled track

Following the walled track to the turning to Lee Gate
Following the walled track to the turning to Lee Gate

We followed the track to our left for about 100m to join a bridleway where it emerged from the field on our left. Here the field wall was constructed from large boulders, much bigger than anything I had seen used for wall construction before.

We passed through the gate at the end of the field and continued along a walled track for about 250m to a point just above the farms at Middle Laithe and Lee Gate. Here the wall on our left ended and there was an open track to our left.

The track leading to Lee gate
The track leading to Lee gate

Wall constructed from large boulders on our way to Lee Gate
Wall constructed from large boulders on our way to Lee Gate

Track down to Lee Gate farm
Track down to Lee Gate farm

Farm access road into New House Farm (National Trust)
Farm access road into New House Farm (National Trust)

Following the path below New House farm
Following the path below New House farm

New House Farm is open to school parties for educational purposes. At the farm house the path bears right to pass in front of the farm buildings and drop down to the bottom of the field. Here we continued through a small gate and walked down the slope next to a wall on our left into the little valley of Heber Beck.

We followed a footpath through Lee Gates farm and out along the track across the fields. After about 400m we came to New House Farm. This farm is owned by the National Trust and is farmed using traditional methods from the early twentieth century.

Path along the farm access road through Lee Gate
Path along the farm access road through Lee Gate

Looking back to New House Farm
Looking back to New House Farm

Following the path down to Heber Beck
Following the path down to Heber Beck

Crossing the stile to drop down to Heber Beck
Crossing the stile to drop down to Heber Beck

Looking back towards New House Farm across Heber Beck
Looking back towards New House Farm across Heber Beck

At map ref. SD 937 644 we turned right through a field gate
At map ref. SD 937 644 we turned right through a field gate

After about 25m from the gate we turned left over a stile
After about 25m from the gate we turned left over a stile

From the gate we followed the path next to the wall on our left for about 25m then we turned left to cross a stile in the wall. From the stile we crossed a small field to a wall corner opposite. At the wall corner, hidden in a clump of tall nettles was a broken down step stile in the wall. We carefully crossed this awkward stile and continued along the footpath following the wall on our right.

Soon there was a stile in the wall which we crossed and made our way down a steep awkward bank to cross the rocky bed of the beck. From the beck we followed the path along a grassy track climbing away from the beck and then following a wall on our right. At map ref. SD 937 644 we turned right through a field gate.

Grassy track climbing up from Heber Beck
Grassy track climbing up from Heber Beck

Meadow sweet with its heavy sweet scent by the path
Meadow sweet with its heavy sweet scent by the path

Broken stone step stile in a clump of nettles
Broken stone step stile in a clump of nettles

Looking south east from the path, down into Wharfedale
Looking south east from the path, down into Wharfedale

Path to Bordley from the broken stone step stile
Path to Bordley from the broken stone step stile

Nearing Bordley along the path by the field edge
Nearing Bordley along the path by the field edge

Entering Bordley
Entering Bordley

The path led us into Bordley through a field with numerous free range hens and cockerels. There was a flock of sheep gathered in a holding pen by the track through the farms.

We continued along the path following the edge of the fields for about 500m to the Bordley. This little settlement seems to consist of just two farms, Bordley Green Farm and Bordley House Farm.

Path to Bordley along the field edge
Path to Bordley along the field edge

Free range poultry as we entered Bordley
Free range poultry as we entered Bordley

Flock of sheep in a holding pen by the track in Bordley
Flock of sheep in a holding pen by the track in Bordley

Looking back as we climbed up the road leaving Bordley
Looking back as we climbed up the road leaving Bordley

Farm access road leaving Bordley
Farm access road leaving Bordley

A last glimps of Bordley as we topped the rise
A last glimpse of Bordley as we topped the rise

The gate leading back onto Malham Moor Lane
The gate leading back onto Malham Moor Lane

We walked along the public road up the hillside for about 400m back to our parking spot by the cattle grid at the top of the field, and the end of our walk. The whole route had been about 8km and it had taken me a little over three hours to walk it.

We followed the road out of Bordley up quite a steep climb from its sheltered position in a little cleft in the hillside. We continued along this access road for about 600m to intercept our outward route at map ref. SD 946 654. Here we turned right to walk through the gateway and rejoin the public road.

The view into Wharfedale as we left Bordley
The view into Wharfedale as we left Bordley

Following the track back towards Malham Moor Lane
Following the track back towards Malham Moor Lane

Following Malham Moor Lane back up the hill to our parking spot
Following Malham Moor Lane back up the hill to our parking spot


Plaque on a boulder by the cattle grid on Malham Moor Lane

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