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Evening mist creeping across the fields near Kirklington
Evening mist creeping across the fields near Kirklington

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Route No. 648 - Saturday 12 November 2016
Kirklington, Lime Lane,
Whinwath Lane circuit - 6km
Kirklington, N. Yorks. . . .

Route map from Ordnance Survey Open Space service.

Map: OS Explorer 302 Northallerton & Thirsk


The village of Kirklington lies between the River Ure to the west and the River Swale to the east, about half way between Ripon to the south and Bedale to the north. We parked by the road side at the large village green, map ref. SE 318 812.

The village green in Kirklington at the start of our walk
The village green in Kirklington at the start of our walk

Parish Church at Kirklington as we left the village
Parish Church at Kirklington as we left the village

Our tuening right off the road at the end of the cemetery
Our turning right off the road at the end of the cemetery

We left the village green by the road at the south west corner called Whitecross Hill. We passed the parish church on our right and at the end of the church cemetery we turned right off the road and followed a public footpath along the edge of the field next to the boundary wall of the cemetery.

This afternoon my son and I drove to Kirklington for a short afternoon walk. The weather forecast was for a fine bright afternoon after the overnight belt of rain had passed through. There were a great many cars parked on the roads around the village green, maybe a wedding at the church or some other event in the village hall?

The cemetery at the parish church
The cemetery at the parish church

Following the path along the field edge away from Kirklington
Following the path along the field edge away from Kirklington

About 600m from the corner of the field we came to a wooden footbridge across a small stream
About 600m from the corner of the field we came to a wooden footbridge across a small stream

We continued along the footpath at the edge of the field
We continued along the footpath at the edge of the field

On our right as we crossed the bridge there was a concrete channel carrying another watercourse (marked on the map as an aqueduct). About another 400m further on around the field edge footpath we came to a second bridge over a watercourse.

After about 50m, at the corner of the field, we turned left and continued following the footpath along the edge of the field. About 600m from the corner of the field we came to a wooden footbridge across a small stream.

400m further on we came to a second bridge over a watercourse
400m further on we came to a second bridge over a watercourse

There is only a feint pale green mark in the new crop to show the route of the path
There is only a feint pale green mark in the new crop to show the route of the path

Setting off from the footbridge across the vast field
Setting off from the footbridge across the vast field

The path is well used and there was a clear path through the growing crop in the summer. Now, with the new crop starting to grow there is only a feint pale green mark in the crop to show the route of the path. We followed this mark across the field to the green barrier.

We crossed the bridge and came into a very large open field where a cereal crop had been sown for next summer's harvest. The public footpath goes in a south westerly direction for over 800m across the huge field to a green painted steel barrier at the field entrance from Lime Lane.

The green painted steel barrier at the Lime Lane entrance
The green painted steel barrier at the Lime Lane entrance

Our route northwards to the old sawn tree trunk at the last pink dot
Our route northwards to the old sawn tree trunk at the last pink dot

Reaching the old sawn tree trunk
Reaching the old sawn tree trunk

The path turns right at this footpath sign
The path turns right at this footpath sign

After about 300m, at map ref. SE 301 805, the path on my map goes straight on, but we followed the route of the path on the ground and turned right and continued along the edge of the field to the field corner. We turned left here continuing along the path at the field edge now next to a small watercourse.

From the green barrier at the Lime Lane entrance to the field the public footpath crosses the field in a northerly direction for about 250m to the corner of the next field where there is the old sawn trunk of a fallen tree at map ref. SE 302 803. From the field corner by this old tree trunk we followed the edge of the field with the hedge on our right.

Continuing along the field edge from the old tree trunk
Continuing along the field edge from the old tree trunk

Path at the field edge with a stream below the trees on the right
Path at the field edge with a stream below the trees on the right

We turned right to cross the footbridge over the stream
We turned right to cross the footbridge over the stream

Path along the field edge from the footbridge
Path along the field edge from the footbridge

One of several deer tracks in the muddy path
One of several deer tracks in the muddy path

Just across the bridge the path turned right and continued along the edge of the field for about 60m to the field corner, then turned left to follow the edge of the field to the farm access road at map ref. SE 302 808.

As we neared the northerly corner of the field we came to a bridge on our right across the watercourse where we re-joined the route of the path shown on my map.

Path along the field edge to a farm access track
Path along the field edge to a farm access track

The farm access track heading towards Kirklington
The farm access track heading towards Kirklington

Looking back towards the footbridge from the farm access track called Whinwath Lane
Looking back towards the footbridge from the farm access track called Whinwath Lane

Following the farm access track towards Kirklington
Following the farm access track towards Kirklington


Passing Plane Tree Buildings along Whinwath Lane

At these farm buildings there were some cattle housed, presumably for the winter ahead. The light was starting to fade now and as we continued along the lane the evening mist was gathering in the fields with the leafless trees silhouetted against it.

To the left the access road leads to Red House, but we kept straight on following the access road called Whinwath Lane back towards Kirklington. After about 1.4km along the lane we came to a sharp bend to the right at Plane Tree Buildings.

Following the farm access track towards Kirklington
Following the farm access track towards Kirklington

Cattle in their winter quarters at Plane Tree Buildings
Cattle in their winter quarters at Plane Tree Buildings


Evening mist creeping across the fields as we returned to Kirklington

Following Whinwath Lane back to Kirklington
Following Whinwath Lane back to Kirklington

The whole route had been 6km and it had take us just two hours to walk, a very pleasant route through undulating farm land.

After another 500m along the lane we reached the corner of the village green back in Kirklington. We followed the road around the green back to our car and the end of our walk.

Back at the village green in Kirklington
Back at the village green in Kirklington

Evening mist creeping across the fields as we returned to Kirklington
Evening mist creeping across the fields as we returned to Kirklington

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