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Looking east along the Six Dales Trail following an old byway from Dob Park Road
Looking east along the Six Dales Trail following an old byway from Dob Park Road

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Route No. 724 - Thursday 7 June 2018
Dob Park Rd, Dob Park Ho Fm, Dob Park Wood,
Dob Park Br, Middle Fm, Rose Tree Fm, Crag Fm
8km circuit - Lower Wharfedale . . .

Route map from Ordnance Survey Open Space service.

Map: OS Explorer 297 Lower Wharfedale & Washburn Valley


Note: At present the A59 from Blubberhouses to Bolton Bridge is closed due to the high risk of further landslips, but Weston Moor Road (called Shepherd Hill at Blubberhouses) is still accessible just before the road closure barrier.

Road side parking spot at the junction of Dob Park Road and Weston Moor Road
Road side parking spot at the junction of Dob Park Road and Weston Moor Road

Setting off along Dob Park Road
Setting off along Dob Park Road

Passing the entrance to Bride Cross House
Passing the entrance to Bride Cross House

This grassy track is the route of the 'Six Dales Trail'. We continued along the road past Bride Cross House and then turned left along the access road towards Dob Park House Farm. About 100m along this access road we turned left off the road over a stile to follow a public footpath around Dob Park Farm House.

This morning my friend, Jim, and I drove out to a little parking area at the junction of Dob Park Road and Weston Moor Road (from Blubberhouses to Otley) at map ref. SE 195 492. From the parking area at the junction we set off heading northwards along Dob Park Road. After about 100m we passed a grassy track coming up the hillside on our right.

Joining the route of the Six Dales Trail on Dob Park Road
Joining the route of the Six Dales Trail on Dob Park Road

Turning left towards Dob Park House Farm
Turning left towards Dob Park House Farm

Turning left on to the footpath around Dob Park House Farm
Turning left on to the footpath around Dob Park House Farm

Rejoining the wide track beyond Dob Park House Farm
Rejoining the wide track beyond Dob Park House Farm

This magnificent bull is a Belgian Blue
This magnificent bull is a Belgian Blue

Bypassing a very boggy patch of the track
Bypassing a very boggy patch of the track

We set off again along the wide track and for about 20m it became very wet and boggy, deep soft mud. Next to the wall on the right of the track there were some rough stepping stones which allowed us to pick our way across the mire.

The path rejoined a wide track about 100m beyond the farm. We followed this track for about 500m to a point where we had a good view of Dob Park Lodge in the field on the right of the track. The lodge dates from the 1600's when the area was a deer hunting park

Following the wide track away from Dob Park House Farm
Following the wide track away from Dob Park House Farm

Ruins of Dob Park Lodge
Ruins of Dob Park Lodge

Continuing along the track past Dob Park Lodge
Continuing along the track past Dob Park Lodge

A last look at Dob Park Lodge through the trees
A last look at Dob Park Lodge through the trees

About to turn right towards Dob Park Wood
About to turn right towards Dob Park Wood

Path down through Dob Park Wood
Path down through Dob Park Wood

Start of narrow fenced path at Low Park farm
Start of narrow fenced path at Low Park farm

We scrambled over the stile into Dob Park Wood and followed a very pleasant path down the slope through the wood to the edge of Low Park farm. At the gate here we turned left to follow a narrow path along the side of a large tank and then along a narrow fenced strip between the field and the woodland to a stile into a field.

The track ended at a gate into a large field with a herd of young beef cattle. One of then took an unhealthy interest in us and had to be sent on its way by waving my trekking pole like a magic wand. We crossed the field to the corner of the wood on our right. Here we turned right in the field to walk down the edge of the wood to a rather awkward high stile at the bottom of the field.

Awkward high stile into Dob Park Wood
Awkward high stile into Dob Park Wood

Path down through Dob Park Wood
Path down through Dob Park Wood

Narrow fenced path at Low Park farm
Narrow fenced path at Low Park farm

Stile from the narrow fenced path to the fields at Low Park farm
Stile from the narrow fenced path to the fields at Low Park farm

Keeping to the right hand edge of the field from Low Park farm
Keeping to the right hand edge of the field from Low Park farm

Young calves keeping an eye on us
Young calves keeping an eye on us

Stile into the wood
Stile into the wood

We continued along the right hand edge of the field to a wooden stile at the bottom. We crossed the stile into woodland again and followed the path down to 'T'-junction in the paths where we turned right. The OS map proclaims 'Cup Marked Rocks' here but we failed to spot any.

We crossed the stile and walked along the right hand side of the field to a plank footbridge over a ditch and a stone step stile over the wall into the next field where there was a group of young calves.

Plank bridge over a ditch & stone step stile
Plank bridge over a ditch & stone step stile

Approaching a stile into the wood
Approaching a stile into the wood

Path through the wood towards the River Washburn
Path through the wood towards the River Washburn

Turning right at the Junction in the paths just above the River Washburn
Turning right at the Junction in the paths just above the River Washburn

Rough boulder crossing of a small watercourse
Rough boulder crossing of a small watercourse

Path following the River Washburn to Dob Park Bridge
Path following the River Washburn to Dob Park Bridge

Dob Park Bridge is a pack horse bridge dating from the early 1600's. Just before reaching the bridge there is another ring marked rock which I believe I photographed but could not see the cup marks as the rock is covered in moss.

After just a few metres there was a rough boulder crossing of a dried up watercourse. We followed the path up from the watercourse and around the edge of an arable field next to the River Washburn. We continued along the path just south of the River Washburn for about 400m to Dob Park Bridge.

Path around the edge of an arable field
Path around the edge of an arable field

We did not see a cup mark on any of these boulders
We did not see a cup mark on any of these boulders

Extract from the Historic England web site about the cup marked rock:-
"The monument includes a carved gritstone rock, partly embedded in the edge of a track. The visible part of the rock measures 1.5m by 1m by 0.7m. It is situated in Dob Park, at the north side of the track on the south bank of the River Washburn, 42m west of the gate. It is with two other large, recently moved boulders and below a recently constructed pond on the other side of the track. The carving consists of one cup mark on the sloping face of the rock facing the track."

Dob Park Bridge, a packhorse bridge dating from the 1600's
Dob Park Bridge, a packhorse bridge dating from the 1600's

Track from Dob Park Bridge up to Middle Farm
Track from Dob Park Bridge up to Middle Farm

Where the track meets the surfaced road at the farm we turned left off the road on to a public footpath across the fields.

From Dob Park Bridge we turned right to follow the track climbing up the hillside for about 750m to Middle Farm.

Track from Dob Park Bridge up to Middle Farm
Track from Dob Park Bridge up to Middle Farm

Turning left at Middle farm off the road to follow the path across the fields
Turning left at Middle farm off the road to follow the path across the fields

Path crossed fields to the farmstead ahead
Path crossed fields to the farmstead ahead

Crossing a marshy field to the farmstead ahead
Crossing a marshy field to the farmstead ahead

Here the path cut across the next two wetland fields to join the access track to an old farmstead where all the buildings have recently been refurbish into holiday cottages.

We followed the path next to the wall on our left across the first field, The path then crossed though a field gate and continued on the other side of the wall.

Stile between two marshy fields
Stile between two marshy fields

Ragged Robin (pink), buttercups & marsh grasses
Ragged Robin (pink), buttercups & marsh grasses

Joining the access track into the farmstead, now refurbished into a holiday cottage complex
Joining the access track into the farmstead, now refurbished into a holiday cottage complex

Path between the holiday cottages
Path between the holiday cottages

Two of several free range cockerels here
Two of several free range cockerels here

Chicken-of-the-Woods fungus on an oak tree stump
Chicken-of-the-Woods fungus on an oak tree stump

The path brought us to the farm access road as it left Farnley Moor Farm where the access road provides a turning circle for the farm vehicles.

From the holiday cottage complex we followed the path across a small water course and across several fields The last few fields had just been cut for silage.

Plank bridge leaving the farmstead behind us
Plank bridge leaving the farmstead behind us

Field path to Farnley Moor Farm
Field path to Farnley Moor Farm

Field path to Farnley Moor Farm
Field path to Farnley Moor Farm

Joining the farm access road at the entrance to Farnley Moor Farm
Joining the farm access road at the entrance to Farnley Moor Farm

The access road leaving Farnley Moor Farm
The access road leaving Farnley Moor Farm

The farm access road heading for Rose Tree Farm
The farm access road heading for Rose Tree Farm

The farm access road heading for Rose Tree Farm
The farm access road heading for Rose Tree Farm

There are clear instructions to open the gate but nothing about closing it again. It turned out that it closes automatically after a time delay. From the gate we continued for the last few metres to the B6451 at map ref. SE 209 492.

We walked along this access road heading south east with a fine view to our left over the Washburn Valley. After about 800m we came to Rose Tree Farm where there is an electrically operated gate across the road.

Cutting the spring grass crop for silage
Cutting the spring grass crop for silage

The farm access road heading for Rose Tree Farm
The farm access road heading for Rose Tree Farm

Passing Rose Tree Farm
Passing Rose Tree Farm

Briefly joining the busy B6451 at Rose Tree Farm
Briefly joining the busy B6451 at Rose Tree Farm

Turning right off the B6451 onto an old byway
Turning right off the B6451 onto an old byway

Nearing Crag Farm along the old byway
Nearing Crag Farm along the old byway

As we neared Crag Farm there was an access drive to the farm on our right and then the old by-way turned round to our right and by-passed the farm.

We continued in the same direction for about 50m along the busy B6451 and then turned right to follow an old by-way. The by-way climbed up the hillside for about 700m to Crag Farm.

Following the old byway up to Crag Farm
Following the old byway up to Crag Farm

Passing the entrance to Crag Farm
Passing the entrance to Crag Farm

Leaving Crag Farm on the route of the Six Dales Trail along the old byway
Leaving Crag Farm on the route of the Six Dales Trail along the old byway

The old byway from Crag Farm
The old byway from Crag Farm

Following the old byway across the fields
Following the old byway across the fields

We followed the track across the fields for another 400m where the track turned sharp left and was again enclosed between stone walls.

From Crag Farm we continued along the by-way for about 500m to the point where the walled track became simply a track across the fields.

Following the old byway across the fields
Following the old byway across the fields

Following the old byway across the fields
Following the old byway across the fields

Left turn where the old byway became a walled track again
Left turn where the old byway became a walled track again

Following the old byway up to Dob Park Road
Following the old byway up to Dob Park Road

Turning left on to Dob Park Road
Turning left on to Dob Park Road

After about 100m we were back to our parking spot at the road junction and the end of our walk. The whole route had been 8km and it had taken us about three hours to walk.

From the bend we followed the walled track still climbing up the hillside for about 400m to Dob Park Road at map ref. SE 195 493 where we turned left to walk along the road.

Following the old byway up to Dob Park Road
Following the old byway up to Dob Park Road

Walking along Dob Park Road back to our parking spot
Walking along Dob Park Road back to our parking spot

Note: Most of the agricultural land we crossed is pasture and most fields contained livestock, sheep or cattle, so this is probably not a route to take a dog.

Returning to our parking spot at the road junction and the end of our walk
Returning to our parking spot at the road junction and the end of our walk

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