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Looking west over Kiln Farm and across Nidderdale
Looking west over Kiln Farm and across Nidderdale

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Route No. 733 - Thursday 9 August 2018
Pateley Bridge, Panorama Walk, Blazefield,
Kiln Farm, River Nidd, Glasshouses,
Six Dales Trail 9km circuit - Nidderdale . . .

Route map from Ordnance Survey Open Space service.

Map: OS Explorer 298 Nidderdale

Note: Details of this walk are available from the NYCC web site




Setting off from the car park, up the High Street in Pateley Bridge
Setting off from the car park, up the High Street (B6165) in Pateley Bridge

Flower bed on the High Street at the sharp right hand bend
Flower bed on the High Street at the sharp right hand bend

The Methodist Church on the right of the B6165
The Methodist Chapel on the right of the B6165

At the main road we turned right and walked up the hill past the many local shops for about 300m to a sharp right hand bend in the road. We followed the road round the bend and past a Methodist Chapel on the right hand side of the road. Just beyond the chapel we turned left off the road to go through a gap in the walk and climb some steps up a steep alley way.

Another fine sunny day. My friend, Jim and I drove to Pateley Bridge in Nidderdale and parked in the long stay car park at the side of the River Nidd next to the B6165 in the town centre at map ref. SE 157 655. From the car park entrance we walked about 30m to the left to the main road, the B6165.

The sharp right hand bend at the top of the High Street
The sharp right hand bend at the top of the High Street

Steps to the Panorama Walk off the B6165 just past the chapel
Steps to the Panorama Walk off the B6165 just past the chapel

Steep path up the Panorama Way
Steep path up the Panorama Way

Steep path up the Panorama Way
Steep path up the Panorama Way

Steps to the path along the top edge of the cemetery
Steps to the path along the top edge of the cemetery

Ahead of us at the junction there was an access road to a large house. We continued around the outer wall of the cemetery to our left and after just a few metres there were some steps up to our left which we climbed to a narrow walled path along the top edge of the cemetery with a fine view across Nidderdale.

The steps are the start of 'The Panorama Walk', a route climbing up the hillside with lovely views over the town and across Nidderdale. We climbed up the tarmac footpath for about 350m until we came to a large cemetery on the right hand side on the path. There was a junction here in front of the entrance to the cemetery where a narrow access road came up to the cemetery.

Path past the cemetery bending to the left
Path past the cemetery bending to the left

Path along the top edge of the cemetery
Path along the top edge of the cemetery

Looking north west over Pateley Bridge and up Nidderdale from the path at the top edge of the cemetery
Looking north west over Pateley Bridge and up Nidderdale from the path at the top edge of the cemetery

Steps to the churchyard at the ruined church of St. Mary's
Steps to the churchyard at the ruined church of St. Mary's

Inside the ruins of St. Mary's church
Inside the ruins of St. Mary's church

After a look around the church and the old grave stones we walked along a path paved with stones on edge up the slope at the side of the church. Just at the top edge of the church we turned right along a similar path to a pedestrian gate from the churchyard into the fields.

We followed this path for about 200m to a few more steps up to a ruined church with more gravestones in the churchyard around it. This is St. Mary's, the old parish church of Pateley Bridge. It was a very bright sunny day, but very dark under the old yew trees in the churchyard.

Inside the ruins of St. Mary's church
Inside the ruins of St. Mary's church

Path out of the shaded churchyard
Path out of the dark shaded churchyard

Looking across Nidderdale as we left the churchyard
Looking across Nidderdale as we left the churchyard

Path across the fields to rejoin the Panorama Walk
Path across the fields to rejoin the Panorama Walk

We rejoined the Panorama Walk heading up to The Rock
We rejoined the Panorama Walk heading up to The Rock

Through this gateway there was a rock platform with iron railings round it. From the platform there was a sheer drop into the valley below and an amazing view across, up & down Nidderdale. This place is called 'The Rock'. Across the valley we could make out the stone pillars of "Yorke's Folly" and I managed to get a photo of it.

We followed the path across the field and past a small stone barn by the gate, then across the next field, though the gate and across this field to a stile into a bracken filled track out of the corner of the field. After just a few metres this track led us back onto the tarmac path called Panorama Walk. After about 200m along the Panorama Walk there was a narrow gateway on the right hand side of the path

Stile to a short length of bracken filled track
Stile to a short length of bracken filled track

Yorke's Folly seen across the valley from The Rock
Yorke's Folly seen across the valley from The Rock


Jim looking out across Nidderdale from the viewpoint at The Rock

Continuing along the Panorama Way through Knott
Continuing along the Panorama Way through Knott

Passing Hole House along the Nidderdale Way
Passing Hole House along the Nidderdale Way

After another 200m from the farm we passed 'Hole House' on the right of the path. About 100m from Hole House we came to a 'T'-junction in the track. Our route to the right was overgrown with gorse and easy to miss.

From The Rock view point we continued along the Panorama walk for almost 300m to the cluster of buildings at Knott. We continued straight on through Knott past 'Knott House Farm' to the left of the path.

Continuing along the Panorama Way through Knott
Continuing along the Panorama Way through Knott

Lovely ripe blackberries by the path
Lovely ripe blackberries by the path

We turned right through the gorse
We turned right through the gorse

Continuing along the track towards the B6265
Continuing along the track towards the B6265

We turned left and walked along the grass verge of the B6265
We turned left and walked along the grass verge of the B6265

At the road we turned left and walked along the grass verge on the left hand side of the road where there was a well walked path. After about 200m we came to the edge of the houses at Blazefield.

After a few metres the gorse gave way to a pleasant, more open track which we followed for about 250m to the B6265 below Blazefield.

About to join the B6265 below Blazefield
About to join the B6265 below Blazefield

Turning right off the B6265 onto an access road in Blazefield
Turning right off the B6265 onto an access road in Blazefield

Following an access road out of Blazefield
Following an access road out of Blazefield

Following an access road out of Blazefield
Following an access road out of Blazefield

About to turn right (yes right) on to Sandy Lane
About to turn right (yes right) on to Sandy Lane

We walked along the access road between stone walls and hedges for about 300m to a road called Sandy Lane, where we turned right. We walked down the road for about 150m to Daleside Farm.

Here we crossed the road (B6265) and turned right to walk along an access road with a row of houses on our left, following the route of the Nidderdale Way.

Following the Nidderdale Way on the access road to Sandy Lane
Following the Nidderdale Way on the access road to Sandy Lane

Walking down Sandy Lane to Daleside Farm on the left
Walking down Sandy Lane to Daleside Farm on the left

Turning left off Sandy Lane just below Daleside Farm to follow a path across the fields
Turning left off Sandy Lane just below Daleside Farm to follow a path across the fields

Gate from Sandy Lane to the field path
Gate from Sandy Lane to the field path

Path along the field edge to The Raikes
Path along the field edge to The Raikes

As we reached the road there was a farm entrance opposite with signs that suggested to me that the farmer was fed up of walkers heading into the farm due to bad navigation, so we were careful to note that the footpath continued up a stone step stile to a narrow footpath down the left hand side of the farm buildings.

Immediately past Daleside Farm we turned left off the road through a field gate to follow a public footpath. The path led us across several fields for about 450m to another road called The Raikes.

Field Path leaving Daleside Farm
Field Path leaving Daleside Farm

Gate on to The Raikes
Gate on to The Raikes

We crossed the road, called The Raikes, to the stile opposite
We crossed the road, called The Raikes, to the stile opposite

Narrow path along the side of the farm buildings
Narrow path along the side of the farm buildings

Over this stile the path continues along side the wall
Over this stile the path continues along side the wall

About to cross the access road to Greenhouse Farm
About to cross the access road to Greenhouse Farm

Small flock of Soay Sheep
Small flock of Soay Sheep by the path

The field contained a number of adult llamas that kept a very wary eye on us as we entered their territory. We followed the path by the wall heading north east to a gate into the next field and continued following the wall as it bent round to our right. Beyond this field the path became a track that dropped down onto a farm access road.

We followed this path along the edge of the fields for about 500m until we were just north of Kiln Farm. We passed through a gate just north of the farm on to an access road that led to Greenhouse Farm on our left. We crossed the access road and walked through a gate, following the public footpath into a field.

Path along the edge of the fields past a beef suckler herd
Path along the edge of the fields past a beef suckler herd

The corner of the field is near by to the left of the gate
The corner of the field is near by to the left of the gate

The path along the field edge above Kiln Farm
The path along the field edge above Kiln Farm

Joining a short length of track to join a farm access road
Joining a short length of track to join a farm access road

Following the farm access road down to Kiln House
Following the farm access road down to Kiln House

Passing in front of Kiln House along the access road
Passing in front of Kiln House along the access road

An adult llama by the access road
An adult llama by the access road

We turned left at a minor road
We turned left at a minor road and . . .


Path along the edge of the field sloping down to the B6165

Path across the field to the B6165
Path across the field to the B6165

Over the wall on our right there was a wide grassy field sloping down to the B6165 below us. There was a herd of cattle away to our right in this field with cows, young calves and a limosin bull. They were over 100m away and took no notice of us at all. (It may have been different if we had had a dog with us).

At this access road we turned sharp right and walked along the access road past Kiln House and from there we continued along the access road for another 250m to a minor road. At the road we turned left and walked along the road for just a few metres. Then we turned right off the road along a tree lined public footpath.

The access road from Kiln House out to the B6165
The access road from Kiln House out to the B6165

One of several alpaccas by the access road
One of several alpacas by the access road

after just afew metres we turned right along this path
. . . after just a few metres we turned right along this path

Stile to the path down to the B6165
Stile to the path down to the B6165

Limosin bull with his harem & offspring in the field we crossed
Limosin bull with his harem & offspring in the field we crossed

A pair of bus stops where we crossed the B6165
A pair of bus stops where we crossed the B6165

Path from the B6165 to the River Nidd
Path from the B6165 to the River Nidd

Steps down to the River Nidd
Steps down to the River Nidd

Path along the northerly bank of the river Nidd
Path along the northerly bank of the river Nidd

Plank bridge over a stream
Plank bridge over a stream

We ignored the footbridge and instead we turned right at the bottom of the steps and followed a public footpath along the river bank. Personally I think that this path on the north side of the river is much prettier than the path along the south side of the river. After several hundred metres along the path we came to the remaining arches of the viaduct that had carried the railway over the River Nidd.

When we reached the B6165 there was a stile and on the road side there was a bus stop with another bus stop and a stile opposite leading to the continuation of the public footpath. We followed the path along the edge of the fields to a wooden stile into the trees at the bank of the River Nidd. We walked down the stone steps to the river bank and straight ahead there was a substantial footbridge across the river.

Stile to the steps down to the River Nidd
Stile to the steps down to the River Nidd

We did not cross this footbridge over the River Nidd
We did not cross this footbridge over the River Nidd

Following the riverbank path
Following the riverbank path

Continuing along the riverbank path
Continuing along the riverbank path

The remains of the viaduct that took the Nidderdale railway over the River Nidd
The remains of the viaduct that took the Nidderdale Railway over the River Nidd

Path along the riverbank heading towards Glasshouses
Path along the riverbank heading towards Glasshouses

River Nidd near Glasshouses
River Nidd near Glasshouses

Nearing a building site at Glasshouses
Nearing a building site at Glasshouses

From the building site we turned left on the road to the river
From the building site we turned left on the road to the river

There is a diversion through the construction site to the minor road. At the road we turned left and walked down the road towards the river. Just before the road bridge over the river we turned right off the road along a wide track.

From the remnant of the viaduct we continued along the riverside path for about 1km to Glasshouses. Normally the riverside path just continues across a minor road but at present there is building work in progress, renovating and converting a large building into riverside apartments.

Path along the riverbank heading towards Glasshouses
Path along the riverbank heading towards Glasshouses

Path along the riverbank heading towards Glasshouses
Path along the riverbank heading towards Glasshouses

Riverside buildings being converted into appartments
Riverside buildings being converted into apartments

We turned right off the road along this track
We turned right off the road along this track

The lake, mill pond really, beside the track
The lake, mill pond really, beside the track

Track next to the lake
Track next to the lake

The ducks were clearly used to being fed. The riverside path here is part of the Six Dales Trail and we continued along this well maintained route towards Pateley Bridge.

Next to the track there was a large attractive lake on our left. We stood at one of viewpoints along the lake, well it's a mill pond really, and at once a large flock of mallard ducks swam rapidly towards us.

Boathouse at the end of the lake
Boathouse at the end of the lake

We continued along this tracl leaving the lake behind
We continued along this track leaving the lake behind

The watercouse on our right is the feeder to the lake
The watercouse on our right is the feeder to the lake

Riverside path heading towards Pateley Bridge
Riverside path heading towards Pateley Bridge

Riverside path heading towards Pateley Bridge
Riverside path heading towards Pateley Bridge

This is also the site of three sculptures. These sculptures by Joseph Dayton are called "Pillars Past" and are part of the "Passing Places" series of sculptures along the Way of the Roses Cycle Route. The three figures represent a monk, a sheep farmer and a lead miner who all helped to shape this area in the past.

A few hundred metres before we reached Pateley Bridge there were some steps from the right of the path up through the wall to the bed of the old Nidderdale railway at the point where there used to be a turntable to set up the engine for the return trip on the single track line along the valley.

The weir & sluices here control the water flow to the lake
The weir & sluices here control the water flow to the lake

Riverside path heading towards Pateley Bridge
Riverside path heading towards Pateley Bridge

Nearing Pateley Bridge along the riverside path
Nearing Pateley Bridge along the riverside path

Sculptures on the old railway bed above the riverside path on the right
Sculptures called "Pillars Past"on the old railway bed above the riverside path on the right

Continuing along the riverside path to Pateley Bridge
Continuing along the riverside path to Pateley Bridge

Passing the riverside cafe next to our car park
Passing the riverside cafe next to our car park

There was a good cafe next to the car park where we had a coffee and a bacon roll before driving home after a very pleasant walk in the sunshine in this lovely valley.

We returned to the river side path and followed it back into Pateley Bridge to the car park and the end of our walk. The whole route had been almost 9km and it had taken us around three hours to walk.

Riverside path entering Pateley Bridge
Riverside path entering Pateley Bridge

Entering the car park from the riverside path
Entering the car park from the riverside path

Back in the car park at the end of our walk
Back in the car park at the end of our walk

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