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Heading south from Harome along Hall Lane which became a narrow farm access road
Heading south from Harome along Hall Lane which became a narrow farm access road

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Route No. 737 - Saturday 1 September 2018
Nunnington, Harome, Hall Lane,
River Rye circuit - 10km
Ryedale . . .

Route map from Ordnance Survey Open Space service.

Map: OS Explorer OL26 North York Moors Western area


Setting off from Nunnington at the junction of Low Street and Church Street
Setting off from Nunnington at the junction of Low Street and Church Street

Crossing the bridge over the River Rye from Low Street
Crossing the bridge over the River Rye from Low Street

This hump in the road is the River Rye flood bank
This hump in the road is the River Rye flood bank

We crossed the bridge over the River Rye at map ref. SE 665 794. From the bridge we followed a public footpath along a stony farm access track at the edge of the fields. Just beyond the river we crossed a hump in the track that is the River Rye flood bank.

This morning we met a group of friends at Low Street, Nunnington in Ryedale for our regular monthly walk together. This months walk was led by our friend Peter so it will be a good one! There was room to park on the roadside where there is a wide grass verge near the junction with Church Street. At this junction we turned right off Low Street.

Looking upstream from the bridge over the River Rye
Looking upstream from the bridge over the River Rye

Following the farm access track away from the River Rye
Following the farm access track away from the River Rye

Stubble field with round bales awaiting collection
Stubble field with round bales awaiting collection

Turning off the farm access road to a track along the field edge
Turning off the farm access road to a track along the field edge

Through the gate we kept the fence on our left
Through the gate we kept the fence on our left . . .

we turned along the field edge towards Crook House Farm
. . . we turned along the field edge towards Crook House Farm

At the field boundary before Crook House Farm the path turned sharp left along the edge of the field and at the end of the field the path turned sharp right along the field edge by the side of the farm. Next to the farm the path turned sharp left and continued along the edge of the fields next to the River Riccal (just a stream really).

About 600m further on the track turned sharp left on to a grassy track along the field edge. After another 200m we turned right off the stony access track to follow a public footpath along a grassy track along the field edge heading for Crook House Farm.

Following the track towards Crook House Farm
Following the track towards Crook House Farm

keeping the fence on our left to the trees ahead
. . . keeping the fence on our left to the trees ahead . . .

Part of a flock of Christmas geese in the field
Part of a flock of Christmas geese in the field

At the side of Crook House Farm we turned left following the course of the River Riccal in the trees on our right
At the side of Crook House Farm we turned left following the course of the River Riccal in the trees on our right

Field path by the River Riccal in the trees on our right
Field path by the River Riccal in the trees on our right

Ploughing next to the path
Ploughing next to the path

Path across the fields to Harome
Path across the fields to Harome

At the sun flower field we turned right over a small wooden footbridge across the River Riccal and followed the route of the public footpath along the length of two fields to Chapel Lane at Harome.

About 750m from Crook House farm came to a small field of sun flowers in full bloom. I think they were for pheasant to hide & feed. The field next to the sun flowers was being ploughed ready for the next crop.

Field of Sunflowers by the path
Field of Sunflowers by the path

Footbridge over the River Riccal
Footbridge over the River Riccal

Path across the fields to Harome
Path across the fields to Harome

Reaching Chapel Lane on the edge of Harome
Reaching Chapel Lane on the edge of Harome

The old Methodist Chaple for sale, Sept 2018
The old Methodist Chapel for sale, Sept 2018

Main Street in Harome
Main Street in Harome

Figure of the Buddha in a front garden
Figure of the Buddha in a front garden

After about 400m we came to St Saviour's Church at the junction with Mill Street. At the junction we continued straight on and then round a left hand bend in Mill Street. Just on the bend on our right hand side is the mill pond that feeds a mill race leading to Harome Mill off Mill Street. There is a good bench seat overlooking the pond where we sat for our lunch.

We climbed the stile from the field to the lane and just to our right there was the old Methodist Chapel with a 'For Sale' sign attached. It's a large building that will make a substantial conversion project for someone. We walked along Chapel Lane past the chapel and round the bend to the Main Street through the village. At the Main Street we turned left and walked through the village.

Chaple Street heading for Main Street in Harome
Chapel Street heading for Main Street in Harome

St. Saviour's Church in Harome
St. Saviour's Church in Harome

Walking around the Pheasant Hotel along Mill Street
Walking around the Pheasant Hotel along Mill Street

Our lunch stop bt the mill pond opposite the Pheasant Hotel
Our lunch stop at the mill pond opposite the Pheasant Hotel

Leaving the pond heading along Mill Street after our lunch
Leaving the pond heading along Mill Street after our lunch

Hall Lane at the road bridge across the River Riccal
Hall Lane at the road bridge across the River Riccal

Combined Harvester ready to move to the next field
Combined Harvester ready to move to the next field

After another 150m from the old mill we came to a road junction where Mill Street joined Chapel Lane and became Hall Lane. We continued along Hall Lane past a large combined harvester parked in a stubble field where no doubt it had been very bust earlier. A little further on a large tractor was harrowing the dry dusty soil presumably ready for planting the next crop.

Across Mill Street from the pond is the Pheasant Hotel with gardens overlooking the mill pond. After our lunch break we set off again along Mill Street. After about 250m we passed Harome Mill on our left, well maintained farm buildings but no sign of milling activity now-a-days.

Joining Hall Lane at the junction of Chaple Lane & Mill Stree
Joining Hall Lane at the junction of Chapel Lane & Mill Street

Following Hall Lane away from Harome
Following Hall Lane away from Harome

Continuing along Hall Lane
Continuing along Hall Lane

Harrowing a dry dusty field by Hall Lane
Harrowing a dry dusty field by Hall Lane

Nearing the end of Hall Lane
Nearing the end of Hall Lane

The bridleway took us to the bank of the River Rye
The bridleway took us to the bank of the River Rye


The bridleway turned right here to cross the ford
We kept straight on following a public footpath

Soon we passed the old railway buildings at Harome Sidings on the route of the old railway line to Helmsley. From the end of the access road we continued along a public bridleway in the fields beside the River Rye heading downstream. We passed a ford across the river for farm vehicles and about 300m further on we came to the old railway bridge over the River Rye.

Hall Lane had now become a narrow farm access road and a large blue tractor was heading towards us. We stepped on to the narrow overgrown verge and there was just enough room for the tractor to pass slowly by with two wheels on the opposite narrow verge. The driver gave us a cheery wave and we all continued on our separate ways

Bridleway from the end of Hall Lane
Bridleway from the end of Hall Lane

Bridleway in the field by the River Rye
Bridleway in the field by the River Rye

Continuing along the field path by the river
Continuing along the field path by the river

The old railway bridge across the River Rye
The old railway bridge across the River Rye

The main span of the bridge over the River Rye
The main span of the bridge over the River Rye

Footbridge over a stream close to its discharge into the river
Footbridge over a stream close to its discharge into the river

Over the stile the path headed at an angle across a large field where there was a herd of cattle lying on the route of the path. Most of the cows had a young calf with them and one in particular was clearly not happy with our presence. She stood up, ears pricked shaking her head with a good set of horns. We gave her and the rest of the herd a wide berth, fortunately we had no dogs with us.

The bridge had one large span across the river and a smaller arch on either side. The riverside path passed under the small arch on our side of the river. We continued along the riverside path in the fields for another 250m. Here there was a wooden footbridge over a stream before it joined the River Rye. We continued along the path around a bend in the river to a stile hidden in the undergrowth of bracken and brambles.


Path by the river heading away from the railway bridge

Bracken & brambles guard the approach to this stile
Bracken & brambles guard the approach to this stile

Crossing the field with wary cows & their young calves
Crossing the field with wary cows & their young calves

The wobbly bridge over the River Rye
The wobbly bridge over the River Rye

From the footbridge we followed the path along a farm track called High Moor Lane, round a block of woodland called Plump Wood. Just beyond the southern corner of the wood we turned left off the track to follow a public footpath in the field with the edge of the wood on our left.

We left the field and turned right to walk about 50m to a footbridge over the River Rye. It was an old bridge with a tubular steel frame. It had been steadied with steel cables back to the river banks in the past but there were only their rusty remnants left now. We crossed one at a time but the old bridge was still quite wobbly much to the dismay of a few of our group.

Starting to follow the track round Plump Wood
Starting to follow the track round Plump Wood

Following the track around Plump Wood
Following the track around Plump Wood

Turning off the track to the field path at the edge of the wood
Turning off the track to the field path at the edge of the wood

Track along the edge of the field next to Plump Wood
Track along the edge of the field next to Plump Wood

We turned left round the corner of Plump Wood
We turned left round the corner of Plump Wood . . .

We followed the path along the side of Low Moor Plantation
We followed the path along the side of Low Moor Plantation

Then we turned right along the edge of the next field with Low Moor Plantation now on our right. We walked along the public footpath to the River Rye. Just before the river we turned right and crossed a wooden footbridge over a small stream before it flowed into the River Rye.

As we approached the corner of the wood on our left at the end of the field there was another block of woodland ahead of us called Low Moor Plantation. At the end of the field we turned left around the corner of the Plump Wood.

then we turned right at the corner of Low Moor Plantation
. . . then we turned right at the corner of Low Moor Plantation

Waiting to cross the footbridge on the right
Waiting to cross the footbridge on the right

Footbridge over a stream shortly before it enters the River Rye
Footbridge over a stream shortly before it enters the River Rye

Continuing on the field path next to the River Rye
Continuing on the field path next to the River Rye

Continuing on the field path next to the River Rye
Continuing on the field path next to the River Rye

The houses of Nunnington come into sight
The houses of Nunnington come into sight

The whole route had been just under 10km and, including our lunch stop by the mill it had taken us around three and a half hours to walk. We left our gear in our cars and walked a few metres along Low Street to a cafe in a courtyard on the left for a coffee & a chat before driving home.

We continued along the riverside path in the fields past a very dilapidated footbridge across the river on our left. Definitely not in use! We continued along the path back to the stile on to Low Street where we had started our walk.

Derilict footbridge over the R. Rye
Derelict footbridge over the R. Rye

The field path nearing Nunnington
The field path nearing Nunnington

The stile from the field path on to Low Street
The stile from the field path on to Low Street

Returning to our roadside parking spot on Low Street at Nunnington
Returning to our roadside parking spot on Low Street at Nunnington

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