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Our lunch stop at a fallen willow tree on Monkton Reach of the River Ouse opposite Beningbrough Hall
Our lunch stop at a fallen willow tree on Monkton Reach of the River Ouse opposite Beningbrough Hall

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Route No. 755 - Saturday 5 January 2018
East Lane, Park Farm, River Ouse,
River Nidd circuit - 7km
Moor Monkton, York . . .

Route map from Ordnance Survey Open Space service.

Map: OS Explorer 290 York


We parked on the village street in Moor Monkton at the start of our walk
We parked on the village street in Moor Monkton at the start of our walk

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Leaving Moor Monkton along East Lane
Leaving Moor Monkton along East Lane

This month's walk was devised and led by our friend Peter. From our parking place we walked east & then southeast along East Lane to the end of the public road. Then we continued along a bridleway heading roughly southeast along an access track for about 150 to a field gate.

This morning my wife and I met a group of friends for our regular monthly walk together. This time we met in the village of Moor Monkton about 2km off the A59 just south of the River Nidd. We parked on the kerb side on the village street at map ref. SE 511 569.

Gate into the fields at the end of East Lane
Gate into the fields at the end of East Lane

Following the bridleway along the edge of the fields
Following the bridleway along the edge of the fields

Following the bridleway along the edge of the fields
Following the bridleway along the edge of the fields

Passage of horses through the thicket had made it very muddy
Passage of horses through the thicket had made it very muddy

At the end of the third field the bridleway continued through a thorny thicket where the ground had been trodden into thick mud by the passage of numerous hooves. After about 150m the bridleway came out of the thicket into a field and there it turned left next to a small stream along the edge of the field.

From the end of the access track we continued through the field gate along the bridleway at the edge of the fields. In the first field we crossed an overhead power line then, in the next field we passed a horse rider.

After the 3rd field the bridleway entered a dense thicket
After the 3rd field the bridleway entered a dense thicket

Through the gate the path was wider and less muddy
Through the gate the path was wider and less muddy

Clear of the thicket we turned left following the bridleway along the bank of a small stream
Clear of the thicket we turned left following the bridleway along the bank of a small stream

Waiting for me before we turned right along the field edge
Waiting for me before we turned right along the field edge

Passing the farm buildings to reach Red House Lane
Passing the farm buildings to reach Red House Lane

We kept to the fence on our left for about 200m to some large out buildings. We followed the bridleway along a track past these out buildings and turned left on to Red House Lane.

We followed the bridleway next to the stream across three small fields and at the end of the third field we turned right and continued along the edge of the field.

With the fence on our left we headed for the farm buildings
With the fence on our left we headed for the farm buildings

Passing the farm buildings to reach Red House Lane
Passing the farm buildings to reach Red House Lane

Walking along Red House Lane towards Park Farm
Walking along Red House Lane towards Park Farm

Female pheasant hiding in the hedge bottom
Female pheasant hiding in the hedge bottom


Bend in the road, Hall Lane, next to Red House Wood


Hall Lane heading into Red House Estate

We followed Hall Lane along the edge of the wood to the entrance to the Red House Estate. We followed the bridleway along Hall Lane into the estate and after about 200m we came to a right hand bend in the road. On our left hand side on the outside of the bend there was a sign fixed to the fence indicating a permissive path to the River Ouse.

We walked along Red House Lane for about 800m to a left hand bend in the road with Park Farm on the outside of the bend. About 100m before Park Farm the road becomes Hall Lane and we continued along the road to a sharp right hand bend at Redhouse Wood.

Passing Park farm on the outside of the bend
Passing Park farm on the outside of the bend

Hall Lane at the entrance to Red House Estate
Hall Lane at the entrance to Red House Estate

We turned left to the river at the bend ahead
We turned left to the river at the bend ahead

Start of the permissive path to the River Ouse from Hall Lane
Start of the permissive path to the River Ouse from Hall Lane

Permissive path through a small wood towards the river
Permissive path through a small wood towards the river

Lagoon at the water intake installation at the River Ouse
Lagoon at the water intake installation at the River Ouse

Permissive path about to join the River Ouse flood bank
Permissive path about to join the River Ouse flood bank

This whole installation is part of a network linking major water resources across Yorkshire to provide operational flexibility and greater security of supply. From the edge of the woodland we turned right and continued along the permissive path keeping to the top of a low embankment around the eastern edge of the lagoon site until we reached the public bridleway along the flood bank beside the River Ouse.

We turned left off the road and followed the permissive path towards the river. We followed the clear path down through some woodland to some rough grassland around a large man-made lagoon. This lagoon is part of the water abstraction installation taking water from the River Ouse. There is a large pumping station at the western end of the lagoon where water from the river is pumped in a pipeline across country to the water treatment works at Eccup on the edge of Leeds

Permissive path towards the River Ouse
Permissive path towards the River Ouse


Path to the river on a low embankment around the lagoon

Following the bridleway along the River Ouse flood bank
Following the bridleway along the River Ouse flood bank

Large pumping station and lagoon at the water abstraction point on the River Ouse
Large pumping station and lagoon at the water abstraction point on the River Ouse

One of several greylag geese at the lagoon
One of several greylag geese at the lagoon

Warning to river traffic approaching the water abstraction point
Warning to river traffic approaching the water abstraction point

Bridleway drops down to cross the fence below the flood bank
Bridleway drops down to cross the fence below the flood bank

We came to a point on the Monkton Reach of the river opposite Beningbrough Hall. Here there was a large fallen willow tree on the flood bank where there was room for us all to sit for a short lunch break. It was a fine place to stop with ducks on the river and a good view of Beningbrough Hall through the trees across the river.

At the flood bank we turned left and walked along the top of the flood bank heading upstream. As we continued up river with the lagoon on our left we could see a large range of brick buildings showing the huge scale of the pumping operation at this site. From the point where we first joined the River Ouse flood bank we walked about 1.8km up-river.

Continuing along the river flood bank
Continuing along the river flood bank

Walking along the River Ouse flood bank
Walking along the River Ouse flood bank

Fallen willow tree where we sat for our lunch break
Fallen willow tree where we sat for our lunch break

Looking across Monkton Reach on the River Ouse to Beningbrough Hall seen from our lunch stop
Looking across Monkton Reach on the River Ouse to Beningbrough Hall seen from our lunch stop

Continuing along the flood bank after our lunch stop
Continuing along the flood bank after our lunch stop

There were a couple of fishermen sitting at the bottom of the flood bank waiting for a bite but it seemed like a very cold pass time today, warm enough walking though.

After our lunch break we continued along the flood bank for another 300m to the confluence of the River Nidd with the River Ouse. It is a pretty place and we stopped for a few moments to admire the scene.

Fisherman at the foot of the flood bank waiting for a bite
Fisherman at the foot of the flood bank waiting for a bite

Looking along the River Nidd to its confluence with the River Ouse
Looking along the River Nidd to its confluence with the River Ouse

Bridleway to Moor Monkton with the River Nidd on our right
Bridleway to Moor Monkton with the River Nidd on our right

Joining the access track from Laund House & Redhouse Wood
Joining the access track from Laund House & Redhouse Wood

At the road, at the edge of Moor Monkton village, we turned right and walked along the village street for about 200m back to our parking spot and the end of our walk. The whole route had been just 7km and including our lunch stop it had taken about two and a half hours to walk. It had been a very pleasant and interesting walk. Thanks Peter !

From the junction in the rivers we turned left and continued along the bridleway following the River Nidd upstream back towards Moor Monkton. After about 450m from the River Ouse we joined the stony access track from Laund House & Redhouse Wood. We followed the bridleway along this access track for about 500m back to East Lane.

Bridleway to Moor Monkton with the River Nidd on our right
Bridleway to Moor Monkton with the River Nidd on our right

About to rejoin East Lane on the edge of Moor Monkton
About to rejoin East Lane on the edge of Moor Monkton

The end of our walk at our parking spot on the village street in Moor Monkton
The end of our walk at our parking spot on the village street in Moor Monkton

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